Nature Bound Africa Safari Adventure Tours Experts!! We go where YOU want and depart when YOU want.
+255-784-737-413

trekking

Olduvai Gorge & Laetoli

Olduvai Gorge & Laetoli

Olduvai Gorge & Laetoli over the last thirty years or so, it has become increasingly apparent that Africa is probably the “Cradle of Mankind“. From Africa they spread out to populate the rest of Earth. Remains of the earliest humans were found in Oldupai Gorge.

 

Olduvai Gorge & Laetoli

Olduvai Gorge is a site in Tanzania that holds the earliest evidence of the existence of human ancestors. Paleoanthropologists have found hundreds of fossilized bones and stone tools in the area dating back millions of years, leading them to conclude that humans evolved in Africa.

Olduvai is a misspelling of Oldupai, a Maasai word for a wild sisal plant that grows in the area. The gorge is located in the Great Rift Valley, between the Ngorongoro Crater and the Serengeti National Park. It is 30 miles from Laetoli, another fossil-rich area. Olduvai Gorge was formed about 30,000 years ago, the result of aggressive geological activity and streams.

The steep ravine is about 30 miles (48.2 km) long and 295 feet (89.9 meters) deep, not quite large enough to be classified as a canyon. A river cuts through several layers to form four individual beds, with the oldest estimated at about 2 million years old.

At Laetoli, west of Ngorongoro Crater, hominid footprints are preserved in volcanic rock 3.6 millions years old and represent some of the earliest signs of mankind in the world. Three separate tracks of a small-brained upright walking early hominid. Australopithecus afarensis, a creature about 1.2 to 1.4 meters high, were found. Imprints of these are displayed in the Oldupai museum.

More advanced descendants of Laetoli’s hominids were found further north, buried in the layers of the 100 meters deep Oldupai Gorge. Excavations, mainly by the archaeologist Louis and Mary Leakey, yielded four different kinds of hominid, showing a gradual increases in brain size and in the complexity of their stone tools. The first skull of Zinjanthropus, commonly known as ‘Nutcracker Man’ who lived about 1.75 millions years ago, was found here. The most important find include Home habilis, Zinjathropus and the Laetoli footprints.

Lushoto Town

Lushoto Town

Lushoto Town is a leafy highland town is nestled in a fertile valley at about 1200m, surrounded by pines and eucalyptus mixed with banana plants and other tropical foliage. It’s the centre of the western Usambaras and makes an ideal base for hikes into the surrounding hills.

Lushoto Town

 

Lushoto is also the heartland of the Wasambaa people (the name ‘Usambara’ is a corruption of Wasambaa or Washambala, meaning ‘scattered’). Local culture is strong. In Muheza and parts of the Tanga region closer to the coast, Swahili is used almost exclusively. Here however, Sambaa is the language of choice for most residents.

Lushoto and its people; it would be hard to know where to start.  It is a town that exists in a nebulous state of optimistic beauty after being hardened by stunning scenery and a breath of fresh air. Like all places where winter likes to settle in for a good, long stay, the people of Lushoto nearly always embrace every moment of cool weather. When you live, visit or grow up in Switzerland, Lushoto sounds about as close and familiar as Switzerland.

It has sweeping landscapes with their towering peaks with farms, the breathtaking view and endless vistas (green and lush scenery) that interest many visitors.
Lushoto boasts of a rich hinterland ideal for farming, which includes bananas, pears, pumpkins, tomatoes, potatoes, yams, maize, cabbage, carrots, capsicum, plumps or apples and more that find their market within the Tanga region and beyond.

Its rainforest is one of the most popular bio diversity places in Africa. Now, it is a centre of one of the best cultural tourism programmes in Tanzania – The Friends of Usambara (www.usambaratravels.com.).
The cultural tourism enterprise provides various activities for visitors, such as guided hikes and cultural visits to the Irente view point, Irente farm, Usambara farms, Magamba rainforests and more. Most of the incomes go to fund development projects such as drilling well in remote areas, building primary school and funding reforestation efforts.

In Lushoto, people live a more traditional lifestyle, and the locals are genuinely happy to see visitors walk by, greeting everyone with big smiles.

Location and access:
Lushoto town is accessed via Mombo town on the Arusha to Dar es Salaam highway. Public transports to Dar es Salaam, Arusha, Moshi and Tanga are available daily.

Accommodation:
Lushoto town has several up-market facilities which include: Mullers lodge, The executive lodge, Irente Cliff lodge, Lawns hotel, Lushoto White House, Swiss farm Cottage, Irente Biodiversity Reserve, Mkuzi creek Resort and more.

USAMBARA CULTURAL TOURISM
Explore, learn and know how we live in the Usambara Mountain, the community history of the indigenous washambaa, and the immigrant local tribe of pare and mbugu, local royality from the ancient to the Germany and British colonial era.

ONE DAY TRIPS FROM LUSHOTO

Irente Viewpoint (5-6 hours, 15km)
From Lushoto town, hike to this outlook for spectacular views of the village of Mazinde and the Maasai plains almost 1000 meters below. Eat lunch at the Irente Biodiversity Farm in their beautiful flower garden.

Magamba Rainforest (5-6 hours)
Walk through villages and farm land to the lush rainforest where you can see black-and-white Colobus monkeys. On the way back, pass by the historic royal village of the Kilindi (the Washambaa ruling clan) and an old German bunker dug during World War I.

Combined Trip—Magamba Rainforest & Irente Viewpoint (7-8 hours, 20km)
For shorter stays in the area, we recommend a combination hike to the Irente Viewpoint and Magamba Rainforest, where you can see Colobus monkeys.

Bangala River (5-6 hours, 15km)
Beginning at Mbuzii, descend slowly down the steep slopes of the Bangala River Valley toward the rising savannah heat. Visit a tree nursery, see traditional irrigation systems, and take in breathtaking views of the Maasai Plains.

Mkuzu Waterfall (5-6 hours, 15km)*
From Muller’s Lodge or Migambo Village, walk through the colorful forest to this local waterfall. Extend your tour by climbing Migambo peak (2400m high!).

Skyline (6-7 hours, 10km)
Jiwe La Mungu (“The footprint of man”)– Visit a famous cable system for transporting logs down the mountain, enjoy wonderful views of Maasai Plains. Learn about the people of the Usambara Mountains, such as the Pare and Shambaa.

Lushoto Town Tour (2-3 hours)
Explore Lushoto and learn about its rich history. View old structures from the town’s German colonial period. On Sunday and Thursday, this tour can be combined with a visit to the colorful Lushoto market.

Usambara Farm (4-5 hours)
Walk through the fertile farmlands of Jaegertal (“Hunter’s Valley”) to a fruit tree nursery. On your request the tour can be extended to include a hike to Vuli peak (2100 meters).

Combined Trip—Lushoto Town Tour and Usambara Farm (4-5 hours)
Tour Lushoto and learn about its German colonial past. Then walk through the fertile farmlands of Jaegertal (“Hunter’s Valley”) to a fruit tree nursery. On your request the tour can be extended to include a hike to Vuli peak (2100 meters).

Montessori Sisters of Ubiri (3-4 hours)
A short walk from Lushoto, visit this beautifully landscaped Catholic mission. Learn about, taste, and buy their locally made cheese, wine, and jams.

Growing Rock (5-6 hours)
From Soni, walk through the villages of Shashui and Kwemula to Kwamongo Peak (“God’s Peak”), famous for its multicolored butterflies and spectacular views of Lushoto and the Handeni plains. Stop by the Soni waterfalls on your way back to Lushoto.

Maweni Spice Tour (5-6 hours)
Hike from Soni to Maweni farm for a picnic in their beautiful garden surrounded by butterflies and a chorus of birds. Along the way, learn about the various spices grown in the Usambara Mountains.

Sakharani Wine Tour (4-5 hours)
Departing from Soni, walk through coffee plantations on the way to Sakarani where Usambara wine is processed. Upon your return, take in the Soni waterfall and visit the local market offering fresh fruits.

Ndelemai Forest (8 hours)
Departing from Soni, wind through coffee plantations and farmland. Explore the dense Ndelemai forest, and on your way back, stop for a visit in Magila Village, known for its traditional irrigation systems. Enjoy this walk through dense lush forests before catching a ride back to Lushoto.

MULTI-DAY TOURS FROM LUSHOTO:

Mtae: The World Viewpoint (2-5 days)
Trek through rainforests, traditional villages, and farmland; visit and sleep in a local home; see local pottery being made; watch the sun set from the top of a village; and experience the traditional life of the Shambaa people. This trip includes many opportunities to visit and learn about the development projects supported by our program. Return to Lushoto by bus, bike, or private transport.

Mazumbai Forest Reserve: The Galapagos of Africa (2-4 days)
From Soni or Bumbuli hike through tea and coffee plantations to the Mazumbai Forest Reserve, home to numerous birds species and black-and-white Colobus monkeys. Return to Lushoto by private transport.

Magamba, Irente, and Carter’s Viewpoint (2-3 days)
Trek through local villages and the Magamba rainforest to Irente viewpoint and then the Irente Biodiversity Farm, famous for their locally made organic food products. After staying overnight at the Farm, hike along the ridges of the mountains to Carter’s viewpoint. The next day, return to Lushoto or continue downhill to Mombo.

Lushoto, Rangwi convent to Mlalo viewpoint (2-3 days)
Trek from Lushoto to the Rangwi Convent for an overnight. Continue with a visit to a village of the Kilindi (the Washambaa ruling clan) and the headquarters of the Shambaa sub-chief to learn about the history of the Usambara chiefdom. This tour can be extended to include a visit to a Shambaa blacksmith at Tewe

Agro Community Cultural tours (2-3 days)
Stay with the local farmers, experiencing the village livelyhood.Visit the royal subchiefs of the mountains,get the chance to see the village festivals and learn how to step and Sing , the Shambaa and Mbugu traditional songs”

(West to East Cultural tour (5-6 days)
Have the general scope of the Usambara Mountains, trekking through the villages from the west to East via the natural forest of Mazumbai, Amani, and Nilo nature reserve to the Estern part of the Mountains.

Usamabara Royal Villages Cultural tour (4-6 days)
Get the chance to learn and experience, the existing culture in the royal villages and the royal families from the ancient time of the Shambaa kingdom to the modern

Kilimanjaro Acclimatization( 3-5 Days)
Lets acclimatize together by walking to the higher altitude villages and have what you deserve to climb the roof of Africa even mount Meru in regard to physical heath of the person.

Usambara bike tours ( 1-7 Days)
The Usambara Mountains is the best place for the mountains bikes, we save both sportsman and others who are in needs to bike and experience the natural and cultural beauty of the Usambaras

Arusha City

Arusha City

Arusha City

Arusha city is located in the northern highlands of Tanzania, beneath the twin peaks of Mount Meru and Mount Kilimanjaro, Arusha is the safari capital of the country. Guests embarking on the popular northern safari circuit all stop in the ‘Geneva of Africa’ to prepare for their journeys into the African bush.

From is two-lane streets, the dramatic crater of Mt. Meru stands over the town like a majestic sentinel, it’s crater strewn with thick clouds, it’s slopes dark with verdant forest. Arusha’s ideal location near the major national parks and it’s highland setting make it a peaceful idyll of relaxation before the start of an exciting journey.

Built by the Germans as a centre of colonial administration administration in the early 20th century, Arusha was a sleepy town with a garrison stationed at the old boma and a few shops around a grassy roundabout. From its backwater status amidst the farmlands and plantations of northern Tanzania, today Arusha is one of the country’s most prosperous towns.

Arusha is a major international diplomatic hub. The city hosts and is regarded as the de facto capital of the East African Community. Since 1994, the city has also hosted the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. It is a multicultural city with a majority Tanzanian population of mixed backgrounds: indigenous Bantu, Arab-Tanzanian and Indian-Tanzanian population, plus small White European and white American minority population. Religions of the Arushan population are Christian, Jewish, Muslim, and Hindu.

The current site of Arusha was first settled in the 1830s by the agro-pastoral Arusha Maasai from the Arusha Chini community, south of Mount Kilimanjaro. They traded grains, honey, beer, and tobacco with the pastoral Kisongo Maasai in exchange for livestock, milk, meat, and skins.

Demand for Arusha’s foodstuffs increased substantially during the 1860s when the Pangani Valley trade route was extended through Old Moshi, Arusha, and ultimately to western Kenya. Although it was not yet a town, it was a regional centre and had a number of urban features.

Despite its proximity to the equator, Arusha’s elevation of 1,400 metres (4,600 ft) on the southern slopes of Mount Meru keeps temperatures relatively low and alleviates humidity. Cool dry air is prevalent for much of the year.

The temperature ranges between 13 and 30 degrees Celsius with an average around 25 degrees. It has distinct wet and dry seasons, and experiences an eastern prevailing wind from the Indian Ocean, a couple of hundred miles east.

Budget friendly accommodation for groups, families, backpackers, longstay etc – We recommend Maura HomeStay

Burunge WMA

Burunge WMA

Burunge WMA

BURUNGE WMA is located in Babati District, Manyara Region along Arusha-Babati-Singida-Dodoma highway, about 120 kilometres from tourist city of Arusha. Home to elephants and Giant Baobab trees

BURUNGE WMA is located in Babati District, Manyara Region along Arusha-Babati-Singida-Dodoma highway, about 120 kilometres from tourist city of Arusha.

The WMA is made up of nine villages from three administrative wards whose revenue from tourism and conservation is sent back to support the local communities to execute social and economic development activities.

Villages which had allocated their land for establishment of the WMA are Sangawe, Mwada, Vilima Vitatu, Ngoley, Kakoi, Olasiti, Manyara, Maweni and Magara.

Burunge WMA is accessible by road transport from Arusha to Makuyuni, a distance of 85 kilometres, then from Makuyuni to the WMA is located about 35 kilometres, between Makuyuni junction and Babati town.
The WMA borders Tarangire and Lake Manyara National parks, which together share the rich wildlife resources living in those two famous national parks in Northern Tanzania. It is 18 kilometres from the Tarangire National park Gate and 10 kilometres from the southern boundary of Lake Manyara National Park.

The most tourist attractions found in Burunge WMA are mostly the wildlife from Tarangire and Lake Manyara National Parks, mostly elephants and other mammals seen in northern Tanzanian parks including the Big Five.

Burunge is as well, famous for its big population of pythons which are rarely found in most wildlife parks in East Africa. Animals migrating as far from Serengeti National Park and Ngorongoro Conservation Area have been spotted in the WMA and added its conservation prominence.

Other than wildlife, the WMA is famous for flamingo and hippo watching in Lake Burunge, sunset over the Tarangire National Park, baobab trees dated over thousand years and seasonal migration of Zebras, Giraffes, Waterbucks, Buffaloes ,Lions, Leopards and other attractive animals from Serengeti, Ngorongoro, Lake Manyara and Tarangire wildlife parks.

Burunge WMA is as well, famous for harbouring elephants with bigger and longer tusks not found in any part of Africa. Visitors to this WMA can enjoy watching more than 200 bird species found inside the community conserved forest which makes the WMA unique.

Burunge WMA has been divided into six blocks and which each investor pay US$ 60,000 as block fee per year, and which 75 percent of the total amount is sent back to local communities through the WMA management. All investors are carrying out photographic safari, since no hunting safari in this WMA.

Tourist activities in the WMA are mostly photographic safaris organised by tour operators. Bicycle riding and walking safaris inside the WMA are the other organized tourist activities taking place there during early morning hours and late afternoons.

Tourist accommodation and recreational services are offered in lodges and camps established inside Burunge WMA. These are Tarangire River Camp,  Tarangire Osupuko Lodge, Maramboi, Chemchem Lodge, Lake Burunge Tented Lodge, UN Lodge and Little Chemchem Lodge.

Little Chemchem Lodge is located closer to Lake Burunge at a place full of wild animals. Some animals seen around there are Giraffes, Zebras, Gazelles, Dik Diks, Warthogs, Elephants, Buffaloes and Lions.

Cultural performances can be organized through traditional dances from the Maasai and Wambugwe groups made up of women and men. Two Cultural Dancing groups have been established in Burunge WMA to entertain visitors booked in lodges and camps within the WMA.

These Groups are “Pevingo Dancing Group” which is made up of men and women, and “Mshikamano Women Group”. Pevingo Dancing Group is made up of 20 traditional dancers from Wambugwe community, among them15 dancers are men and the rest five are women.

Most songs composed do carry wildlife conservation messages to attract local communities involvement in wildlife conservation, while campaigning for anti-poaching and environmental protection, also strengthening good neighbourliness with Tarangire National Park.

Mshikamano Women Group was launched in 2004 as an initiative of 30 women members, all engaged on various cultural activities. The group do organize traditional dances to visitors (tourists) booked in lodges within the WMA.

It is an economic generating group as well, specialized in weaving of various, attractive ornaments and utensils using the grass. Among the products are trays, dustbins, table mats, small containers, foods covers and also various home utensils.

Mgungani Women Group is the other local community initiative to raise incomes of women through gains in tourism and wildlife conservation. The group was formed in 1997 by 50 Maasai women entrepreneurs through 10 Village Cooperative Banks (VICOBA).

Located near the entry gate to Tarangire National Park, the group sell ornaments and decorations to tourists calling in the park. Other women groups in Burunge WMA are Einoti Maasai Women Group and Tarangire Emanyata, all specialised on cultural activities.

Enduimet WMA

Enduimet WMA

Enduimet WMA

LOCATED in Longido District on the Basin land of the western foothills of Mount Kilimanjaro, Enduimet Wildlife Management Area (WMA) was established in 2003 with land allocated by nine villages covering an area of 1,282 kilometres.

The Small Garden of Eden, home to biggest elephants in East Africa.
LOCATED in Longido District on the Basin land of the western foothills of Mount Kilimanjaro, Enduimet Wildlife Management Area (WMA) was established in 2003 with land allocated by nine villages covering an area of 1,282 kilometres.

The Enduimet WMA shares its border with Kilimanjaro National Park to the southeast, Engarusai Open Area to the west and the Kenyan border to the north.

Enduimet WMA sets a good example of a community based conservation area where local Maasai pastoralists are benefiting from tourism and conservation initiatives.

The conserved area occupies the Ol Molog and Tinga Tinga wards in Longido district in Arusha region and is occupied wholly by Maasai pastoral communities. Its operation office is located at Ol Molog ward in on the closer slopes of Mount Kilimanjaro.

Engasurai Open Area is the main attractive geographical feature within Enduimet WMA where animals frequently move to in search for water and hunting ground for predators.

Photographic safaris is the most and well established tourist activity in Enduimet and where tourists from various parts of the world flock to view wild animals. The Kitendeni Corridor is located within the WMA and is a migration route for animals roving between Tsavo West, Mkomazi, Kilimanjaro and Amboseli National parks in Tanzania and Kenya.

Enduimet WMA is divided into three zones of Olkunonoi-Kitendeni
Wildlife Corridor Zone, the Engasurai Tourist Hunting Zone and the Sinya Photographic Safari Zone.  It comprises as well, the northern portion of the larger Kitendeni Wildlife Corridor, which is critical to the survival of both Kilimanjaro and Amboseli National Parks. The corridor serves as an important seasonal migration route and dispersal area for wildebeest, zebras and elephants moving between the two national parks.

The Zones are currently running photographic safaris since no tourist hunting taking place in the whole of Enduimet WMA’s conserved land. With a purpose to conserve Enduimet WMA as a part of the Kilimanjaro and Amboseli ecosystem, no trophy hunting business taking place in this area.
The conserved Area has a very unique and extensive plains ecosystem that is home to an abundance of wildlife and is the only WMA that protects a transboundary corridor between Kilimanjaro and Amboseli National Parks.

Ecologically, the WMA provides connectivity between the Mkomazi, Arusha, Amboseli and Kilimanjaro National Parks and the Greater Tsavo Ecosystem in Kenya.

Enduiment Wildlife Management is endowed with numerous tourist attractions.  Wildlife including giraffes, Thomson gazelles, zebras, and wildebeest, some concentrated at Engasurai plain and which looks like Ngorongoro Crater, commonly referred as “The Small Garden of Eden”.

Elephants, Oryx, Zebras, Giraffes, Lions, Buffaloes, Leopards, Elands, Wildebeests, Hyenas and other African big mammals can easily been seen in the WMA and Sinya, a private concession of about 600 square km, bordering Kenya in Amboseli National Park, offering spectacular landscapes with magnificent views of Kilimanjaro, Mount Meru, Ol Doinyo Longido and Ol Doinyo Orok.  Enduimet is a home to biggest elephants in East Africa.

Other tourist attractions including the “Seven Hill Sisters”: These are small hills located within the Enduimet WMA, each with different heights, but standing together, looking like sisters from one parent, born at different dates.

Cultural Tourism is another tourist activity in Enduimet WMA. Maasai Bomas provide cultural entertainment through traditional Maasai songs and ways of life among the Maasai communities like meat roasting (Nyama Choma), milking cows and folklores. Tourist walking safaris and bush camping safaris can be arranged as well.

Tourist accommodation and recreational services are offered at different lodges and camps established inside Enduimet WMA. These are Elerai Tented Lodge,  Shuma’ta Camp, Tembo Camp and Chui Campsite.

Best time to visit Enduimet WMA is in November when the entire area is full green, but visitors can book and visit there all the year round.  Foreign visitors are charged dollars 10 (US$ 10) as fees to enter and spend a day inside the WMA. Local tourists are charged Sh. 1,000 per day for adults and Sh 500 for children.
Access to Enduimet WMA is easy and possible all the year, except during rainy seasons when some roads and tourist tracks inside the WMA are not passable.

Enduimet WMA is connected by a rough road from Longido District Headquarters. The distance from Arusha City to Longido District Headquarters is 77 kilometres, while from Longido to Enduimet WMA gate is 25 kilometres.

From Enduimet to Arusha via Sanya Juu and Bomang’ombe is 120 kilometres and takes up to 3 hours by bus or a car. Tourists travelling from Arusha, Nairobi and Moshi could either use this road to connect from the Arusha to Nairobi highway.
The WMA can also be reached using a gravel road from Bomang’ombe through Sanya Juu and Engare Nairobi or the rough road from Arusha to Namanga road through Longido village to Sinya, Ngereiyani and Tingatinga.
Going there by a passenger bus, a visitor can board a mini-bus from Arusha to Bomang’ombe, then Bomang’ombe to Sanya Juu then and Ol Molog where the WMA’s operations office is located.

Mount Ol doinyo Lengai

Mount Ol doinyo Lengai

“Mount Ol doinyo Lengai” means “The Mountain of God” in the Maasai language. The summit of this strato-volcano is 2962 metres above sea level, and affords direct views into the caldera of Tanzania’s only officially-certified active volcano, and the world’s only carbonatite volcano; records of eruptions have been maintained since 1883, the largest of which deposited ash 100 kilometres away in Loliondo on the Kenyan border to the north west.

Mount Ol doinyo Lengai

It is located in northern Tanzania lying just south of Lake Natron in the Rift Valley, in the heart of Maasai country, and locally regarded as a sacred mountain. Looking north from it’s summit crater, the hot barren salt flats of Lake Natron stretch into the distance. To the south stretch the crater Highlands and the Ngorongoro Game Reserve. The eastern horizons dominated by Mount Kilimanjaro and to the west the forested escarpments and hills comprising the western slopes of the Rift Valley. Every seven years Lengai erupts and plumes of smoke billow out of the crater.

It is possible to walk across the crater floor. The ascent of Oldoinyo Lengai is demanding on account of the day time heat, lack of water, steep and unsuitable slopes of ash and crumbly rocks and considerable height gain. Normally you can start ascending to summit early in the morning and reach to summit at sunrise. Short and a warm jacket are suitable for ascent, also long trousers are good as the summit before dawn can be cold. Access route from the North West allows an early descent to be made from the summit in the morning shadow.

Standing at 2,878 meters above the Soda Ash Lake Natron, Mountain of GOD as famous to the Maasai community that inhabit the area, Mountain Ol’doinyo Lengai is situated in the Ngorongoro highlands and the African Rift valley about 120 kilometers Northwest of Arusha, Tanzania.

Since the past ancestors the Holly Lengai has been used by Maasai for their prayer to their GOD known as NGAI. Ol’doinyo Lengai is the only active volcano in the world that erupt natrocarbonatite lava which is cooler than other lavas about (510 degrees C) compare to the temperatures of basaltic lavas (1,100 degrees C) with less silicon.

The Mountain frequently does minor eruptions and form cone like structures to its crater base.

While on the summit of Mountain Ol’doinyo Lengai one can sight clearly the Soda Lake Natron which accommodates and consist of good nesting sites for different bird species especially the Flamingos, pelicans and geese more than 350 different types are recorded to date.

Unlike others two highest Mountains, Lengai takes about six to seven hours to the summit crater. Also the Mountain is an ideal place for a working safari escort by the Maasai guides with weapons tourist can sight wild animals like olive baboon, velvet, monitor lizard, hyenas, lion, leopard, jackal, Grant’s gazelle, impala and zebra.

The nearby are the Maasai BOMAS that gives you a chance to interact with the indigenous learn their cultures, taboos and traditional.

Selous Game Reserve

Selous Game Reserve

Selous Game Reserve is Africa’s largest game reserve and one of favourite game viewing areas in Africa. Covering 50,000 square kilometres, is amongst the largest protected areas in Africa and is relatively undisturbed by human impact

Selous Game Reserve

Africa’s largest and oldest game reserve is one of its most scenic wildlife destinations; the Selous is utterly beautiful.  The beauty of the park is matched by the quality of a safari here; boating, walking and fly camping compliment standard game driving in thriving wildlife areas.  This is an outrageously good safari park and an essential component of any southern circuit itinerary.

The Selous is a superb safari destination for both family safaris and African honeymoons, all the better for the ease of getting there and the lack of crowds.  The park has the widest diversity of safari activities in the country, offering the boating safaris as well as standard game drives, walking safaris and legendary fly camping trips.

The Northern section of Selous is home to a network of channels and lagoons that run off the Rufiji River.  This lush landscape provides a water supply for the region’s game and towards the end of the dry season the concentration of animals around these water sources is phenomenal.  It is here, around the river and lakes, that the majority of the camps are based; successfully relying on the animal’s need for water to provide game viewing areas.  Selous is in its peak season from July through to the middle of November – this when the dry season is raging and all the game homes in on the few permanent water sources.

The sheer volume of game in the Selous is outstanding with statistics putting most parks in Africa to shame.  Elephant, buffalo and lion are ‘arguably’ found in no greater numbers year round anywhere on the planet.  But it is the Selous’ reputation as the last true stronghold for African wild dog that draws the enthusiasts.

Mahale Mountains National Park

Mahale Mountains National Park

The Mahale Mountains National Park like its northerly neighbor Gombe is home to some of the Africa’s last remaining wild chimpanzees, a population of roughly 900, they are habituated to human visitors by a Japanese research project founded in the 1960s.

Mahale Mountains National Park

Tracking the chimps of Mahale is a magical experience.

Mahale is located in the Western Tanzania to the South of Kigoma town, it is bordering Lake Tanganyika-the World’s longest, second deepest and least polluted freshwater lake-harbouring an estimated 1000 fish species.

Best time to visit the park
The dry season (May -October) is the best period. During this period, chimpanzees are likely to be seen in big groups, the sunshine illuminates the fish in the Lake and the beach is an inviting place to relax. However, Mahale Mountains National Park is accessible all year round. A visit in the rainy season can also be a memorable experience, made remarkable by views of the neighbouring country DR Congo across the water and by incredible lightning storms that light up the lake at night.

Tourist Attractions
– The Chimpanzees
– Chain of Mountains (Mahale range)
– Forest fauna and flora (Angola colobus, red colobus, red-tailed and blue monkeys, forest birds, alpine bamboo, montane rain forest etc).
– Beach along Lake Tanganyika
– Local fishermen
– Sun set on the Lake horizon

What to do
Chimp tracking (allow 2 – 3 days)
– Hiking to the Park’s highest point “Nkungwe” (8,069ft) held sacred by the local Tongwe people.
– Camping safaris
– Snorkeling
– Sports fishing and many more water sports activities

Park Accessibility
Mahale is accessible by air, road and boat. There are several flights, car and boat options to suit most travelers and chimps lovers:

Direct flights to Mahale
This is the easiest way to reach Mahale. During the peak tourist season (June to October) the three tour operators with camps in Mahale schedule regular flights between the park and Arusha town. Between October and March flights arrive and leave twice each week. Between March, April and the first half of May Camps close therefore there are no scheduled flights.

However it is also possible for visitors to arrange their own charter flights. Tanzania has a large number of charter flight companies such as Air Excel, Northern Air and Regional Air to mention a few. Private charters can be arranged from major cities of Arusha, Kilimanjaro, Dar es Salaam, Mwanza or Zanzibar.

The airstrip at Mahale is suitable for light aircraft only with the capacity of up to 12 passengers.

Travel to Mahale via Kigoma
Kigoma can be reached via several routes:
– By Air: Air Tanzania schedules daily flights from Dar es Salaam to Kigoma. The flight takes about 3 hours.
– By Road: Road provides accessibility to Kigoma, but it can be rough and impassable, especially in the rainy season. From Arusha it takes 2 or 3 days to reach Kigoma by car, a 4-wheel drive vehicle is required.
– By Rail: Trains from Dar es salaam leave 2-3 times a week. The journey takes about three days and two nights.

From Kigoma: Mahale can be reached by boat, by light aircraft or by car.
Transport to Mahale by speedboats or timber boats from Kigoma can be arranged with the Park or private operators in Kigoma. The speedboats take between 4 and 5 hours to reach the park while timber boats can take up to 15 hours or more.

A large steamship – MV Liemba – leaves Kigoma twice a month [on Wednesday afternoon], carrying passengers and cargo the length of the Lake to Zambia. It makes numerous stops along the way, including one for Mahale, which is referred to as Lagosa (the old name) or famously known as Mgambo. MV Liemba takes around 10 hours to reach Lagosa-Mgambo from Kigoma, and it passes Mahale again on its return journey [either Sunday or Monday morning].

From Lagosa-Mgambo one may organize the park boats for a pick up.

Mahale is 45 minutes from Kigoma town by light aircraft. A few safari companies offer private charter flights from Kigoma to Mahale and other National Parks in western Tanzania.

Road; Either drive 2 hrs South of Kigoma via Simbo Village (160km ) crossing Malagarasi river to Herembe village (passable during dry season) or drive 122km to Sigunga Village upon arrangement with Park HQ for boat transfer to the Park maximum 1 or 2 hrs boat cruise respectively.

PARK REGULATIONS
Mahale Mountains National Park is home to one of Africa’s most studied chimpanzee populations. The support that visitors give through payment of park entrance fees provides the Park with the means to safeguard and protect this unique population of chimpanzees and the beautiful forest that they inhabit.

Park rules and regulations
– Keep to the authorized trails.
– Do not disturb wild animals in any way. Do not make noise.
– Be considerate to fellow visitors – do not disturb them or the animals they are watching.
– Do not take any pets or guns into the park.
– Do not uproot, pick, cut or damage any plant or be in possession of any part of a plant indigenous to the park.
– Do not light any fire or discard any burning object.
– Do not discard any litter.
– Between 7.00p.m and 6.00a.m remain in the immediate vicinity of designated accommodation facilities (tented camps, tourist bandas, rest house or campsites).
– A permit is valid for single entry within 24 hours only.

Chimp Viewing Regulations
– Maintain a distance of at least 10m from the chimps at all times. This minimizes the risk of you transmitting bacteria and viruses to them.
– Always wear a mask (provided by your guide) over your nose and mouth when you are close (

<50m) to chimps.
– DO NOT eat or drink while you are near the chimps – move at least 250m away.
– DO NOT leave personal belongings on the ground or where they are accessible to the chimps. They are curious animals and your belongings can transmit disease. If you need help carrying bags, your guide will be happy to assist you.
– DO NOT leave any rubbish behind. It can be harmful to all kinds of wildlife and it can transmit diseases to the chimps.
– If you feel the urge to cough or sneeze when you are near the chimps, please cover your nose and mouth to reduce the distribution of germs.
– Try not to go to the toilet in the forest. If it is unavoidable, move at least 250m from the chimps and ask your guide to dig a deep hole.
– It is not permitted to visit the chimps if you are sick or have infectious disease. Please be responsible and tell your camp managers if you don’t feel well. You are risking the chimps’ health by visiting them while sick. The manager will decide the best way.
– No person under the age of 12 is permitted to visit the chimps. This is for their own safety and because young people are more likely to transmit infectious disease.
– No more than 6 visitors (plus one guide) are permitted close to the chimps at any one time. If another group is with the chimps when you arrive, please wait at a spot chosen by your guide, at least 250m away from the animals.
– Maximum viewing time is one hour. If the chimps are moving and viewing is interrupted, your time will be paused until they have been relocated, but tracking is not permitted for longer than 3hours after the initial chimp sighting, even if the one hour total has not been reached. This is to minimize disturbance to the animals and to the forest.

GENERAL SAFETY RULES
Mahale’s chimps have been studied and habituated for more than 40 years and are well accustomed to people. Nevertheless, they are wild animals and it is important that you avoid doing anything that may antagonize them or that they may see as a challenge or a threat.

– When near the chimps, please remember to keep your voices low. This will also help you to observe the other wonderful and varied wildlife of the Mahale forest.
– Do not point at the chimps or make any sudden movements.
– Avoid direct eye contact with them because they may perceive this as aggressive or threatening behavior.
– Do not use perfume, smoke or spit.
– When near the Chimps: Stay in a tight group, try to sit or squat rather than standing, as this minimizes disturbance. Also be sure that your group does not completely surround the chimps.
– In the unlikely event that a chimp charges towards you, move to the nearest tree, stand up and hold on tightly to the trunk. Above all, don’t panic or run, adhere to your guide’s instructions.
– If the chimpanzees move closer to you than permitted distance (10 meters), don’t make any sudden movements to increase the distance. Simply move back slowly away from them.
– Camera flashes must be switched off. Flash photography can disturb and antagonize the chimps.

ACCOMMODATION
Park facilities
The park has five self-contained tourist bandas. Each banda has two rooms with twin beds and a private bathroom. Kitchen facilities are available for self-catering and cooks can be hired locally to prepare your meals. Visitors may bring their food staff and drinks.
Bandas are suitable for budget travelers and students.
Currently the park has three luxury tented camps owned and run by private investors

Mount Kilimanjaro National Park

Mount Kilimanjaro National Park

Mount Kilimanjaro National Park

Mount Kilimanjaro National Park At 5896m

Mount Kilimanjaro National Park Africa’s highest mountain and one of the continent’s magnificent sights, It has three main volcanic peaks, Kibo, Mawenzi, and Shira. The name itself “Kilimanjaro” is a mystery wreathed in clouds. It might mean Mountain of Light, Mountain of Greatness or Mountain of Caravans.

Above the gently rolling hills and plateaux of northern Tanzania rises the snowy peak of Mt. Kilimanjaro, it’s slopes and glaciers shimmering above the rising clouds. Kilimanjaro is located near the town of Moshi and is a protected area, carefully regulated for climbers to enjoy without leaving a trace of their presence. The mountain’s ecosystems are as strikingly beautiful as they are varied and diverse. On the lowland slopes, much of the mountain is farmland, with coffee, banana, cassava, and maize crops grown for subsistence and cash sale. A few larger coffee farms still exist on the lower slopes, but much of the area outside the national park has been subdivided into small plots. Once inside the park, thick lowland forest covers the lower altitudes and breaks into alpine meadows once the air begins to thin. Near the peak, the landscape is harsh and barren, with rocks and ice the predominant features above a breathtaking African view.

Climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro is the highlight of most visitors’ experiences in Tanzania. Few mountains can claim the grandeur, the breathtaking views of Amboseli National Park in Kenya, the Rift Valley, and the Masaai Steppe, that belongs to Kilimanjaro. Hiking on the ‘rooftop of Africa’ — the highest point on the continent at 5896 metres — is the adventure of a lifetime, especially because, if paced well, everyone from seasoned trekkers to first-time enthusiasts can scale the snowy peak. For more information, see the ‘Mountain Climbing‘ section under ‘Things to Do.

Kilimanjaro. The name itself is a mystery wreathed in clouds. It might mean Mountain of Light, Mountain of Greatness or Mountain of Caravans. Or it might not. The local people, the Wachagga, don’t even have a name for the whole massif, only Kipoo (now known as Kibo) for the familiar snowy peak that stands imperious, overseer of the continent, the summit of Africa.

Kilimanjaro, by any name, is a metaphor for the compelling beauty of East Africa. When you see it, you understand why. Not only is this the highest peak on the African continent; it is also the tallest free-standing mountain in the world, rising in breathtaking isolation from the surrounding coastal scrubland – elevation around 900 metres – to an imperious 5,895 metres (19,336 feet).

Climbing Certificates

Kilimanjaro is one of the world’s most accessible high summits, a beacon for visitors from around the world. Most climbers reach the crater rim with little more than a walking stick, proper clothing and determination. And those who reach Uhuru Point, the actual summit, or Gillman’s Point on the lip of the crater, will have earned their climbing certificates and their memories.

But there is so much more to Kili than her summit. The ascent of the slopes is a virtual climatic world tour, from the tropics to the Arctic. Even before you cross the national park boundary (at the 2,700m contour), the cultivated footslopes give way to lush montane forest, inhabited by elusive elephant, leopard, buffalo, the endangered Abbot’s duiker, and other small antelope and primates. Higher still lies the moorland zone, where a cover of giant heather is studded with otherworldly giant lobelias.

Above 4,000m, a surreal alpine desert supports little life other than a few hardy mosses and lichen. Then, finally, the last vestigial vegetation gives way to a winter wonderland of ice and snow – and the magnificent beauty of the roof of the continent.

About Kilimanjaro National Park

Size: 1668 sq km 641 sq miles).
Location: Northern Tanzania, near the town of Moshi.

Getting there

– 128 km (80 miles) from Arusha.
– About one hour’s drive from Kilimanjaro airport.

What to do

– Six usual trekking routes to the summit and other more-demanding mountaineering routes.
– Day or overnight hikes on the Shira plateau. Nature trails on the lower reaches.
– Trout fishing.
– Visit the beautiful Chala crater lake on the mountain’s southeastern slopes.

Accommodation

– Huts and campsites on the mountain.
– Several hotels and campsites outside the park in the village of Marangu and town of Moshi.

NOTE:

– Climb slowly to increase your acclimatisation time and maximise your chances of reaching the summit.
–  To avoid altitude sickness, allow a minimum of five nights, preferably even more for the climb. Take your time and enjoy the beauty of the mountain.

NEW RATES FOR PORTERS AND GUIDES (JUNE ’08 2021)

Porters – USD 10 per day
Cooks – USD 15 per day
Guides – USD 20 per day

Gombe Stream National Park

Gombe Stream National Park

Gombe Stream National Park, located on the western border of Tanzania and the Congo, is most famous for Jane Goodall, the resident primatologist who spent many years in its forests studying the behaviour of the endangered chimpanzees.

Situated on the wild shores of Lake Tanganyika, Gombe Stream is an untamed place of lush forests and clear lake views. Hiking and swimming are also popular activities here, once the day’s expedition to see the chimpanzees is over.

Gombe Stream’s main attraction is obviously the chimpanzee families that live protected in the park’s boundaries. Guided walks are available that take visitors deep into the forest to observe and sit with the extraordinary primates for an entire morning — an incredible experience and one that is the highlight of many visitors’ trips to Africa. Besides chimpanzee viewing, many other species of primates live in Gombe Stream’s tropical forests. Vervet and colobus monkeys, baboons, forest pigs and small antelopes inhabit the dense forest, in addition to a wide variety of tropical birdlife.

An excited whoop erupts from deep in the forest, boosted immediately by a dozen other voices, rising in volume and tempo and pitch to a frenzied shrieking crescendo. It is the famous ‘pant-hoot’ call: a bonding ritual that allows the participants to identify each other through their individual vocal stylizations. To the human listener, walking through the ancient forests of Gombe Stream becomes a spine-chilling outburst which is also an indicator of imminent visual contact with man’s closest genetic relative: the chimpanzee.

Gombe is the smallest of all the Tanzania’s national parks: a fragile strip of chimpanzee habitat straddling the steep slopes and river valleys that hem in the sandy northern shore of Lake Tanganyika. Its chimpanzees – habituated to human visitors – were made famous by the pioneering work of Jane Goodall, whom in 1960 founded a behavioural research program that now stands as the longest-running study of its kind in the world. The matriarch Fifi, the last surviving member of the original community – that was only three-years old when Goodall first set foot in Gombe – is still regularly seen by visitors.

Chimpanzees share about 98% of their genes with humans, and no scientific expertise is required to distinguish between the individual repertoires of pants, hoots and screams that define the celebrities, the powerbrokers, and the supporting characters. Perhaps you will see a flicker of understanding when you look into a chimp’s eyes, assessing you in return – a look of apparent recognition across the narrowest of species barriers.

The most visible of Gombe’s other mammals are also primates. A troop of beachcomber olive baboons, under study since the 1960s, is exceptionally habituated, whereas the red-tailed and red colobus monkeys – the latter regularly hunted by chimps – stick to the forest canopy.

The park’s 200-odd bird species range from the iconic fish eagle to the jewel-like Peter’s twinspots that hop tamely around the visitors’ centre.

After dusk, a dazzling night sky is complemented by the lanterns of hundreds of small wooden boats, bobbing on the lake like a sprawling city.

About Gombe Stream National Park
Size: 52 sq km (20 sq miles), Tanzania’s smallest national park.
Location: 16 km (10 miles) north of Kigoma on the shore of Lake Tanganyika in western Tanzania.

Getting there
Kigoma is connected to Dar and Arusha by scheduled flights, to Dar and Mwanza by a slow rail service, to Mwanza, Dar and Mbeya by rough dirty roads, and to Mpulungu in Zambia by a weekly ferry.
From Kigoma, local lake-taxis take up to three hours to reach Gombe, or motorboats can be chartered, taking less than one hour.

What to do
Chimpanzee trekking, hiking, swimming and snorkeling;
Visit the site of Henry Stanley’s famous “Dr Livingstone I presume” at Ujiji near Kigoma, and watch the renowned dhow builders at work. .

NOTE
Strict rules are in place to safeguard you and the chimps. Allow at least 2 days to at least see them – this is not a zoo so there are no guarantees where they’ll be each day.