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Tanzania Covid-19 Travel Requirements

Tanzania Covid-19 Travel Requirements

Traveling to and from Tanzania during Covid-19

The information for Tanzania Covid-19 Travel Requirements on this page will be updated periodically as requirements and protocols change. Date of last update: 31/Dec/2021. The information below summarizes the content of Travel Advisory No. 9

Leaving Home

Your international airline may have pre-boarding testing requirements. Please study the requirements of your airline and international airport(s) carefully. Most of our guests travel through Amsterdam and currently if you have a transfer in Amsterdam you do not need to show a negative PCR or NAAT test result or rapid test result on arrival in the Netherlands. A transfer is when you change planes and continue your journey within a few hours, and in any case within 1 day without leaving the airport where you transfer. Please make sure to check the entry requirements of your final destination.

Arriving into Tanzania

Tanzania requires filling out a Traveler’s Health Surveillance Form within 24 hours prior to arrival. Follow this link: https://afyamsafiri.moh.go.tz/.  Once completed the traveler will receive a completion notification containing their Unique Health Code (UHC) which they will present upon arriving. If arriving directly onto Zanzibar, please use this link instead.

Additionally, all travelers are required to present a negative COVID-19 test certificate upon arrival. The test must be a Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) test  or Nucleic Acid Amplification Tests (NAATs), with the sample tested within 96 hours BEFORE arrival to Tanzania.

All travelers arriving from countries experiencing variants of concern/interest or who have traveled through those countries in the last 14 days (regardless of route taken) will be subjected to Rapid tests at their point of entry a their own cost.  The Rapid test cost is $10 per traveler  (or $25 per travel if arriving directly onto Zanzibar) and can be pre-paid online when you complete your online Traveler’s Health Surveillance Form (strongly recommended to pre-pay to avoid unnecessary queue upon arrival).

Traveling in Tanzania

While traveling in Tanzania, standard Covid-19 protocols (masking, social distancing, and sanitizing) will be adhered to by your guide and those working in the tourism industry, while in public settings, airports/airplanes, and the common areas of accommodations. All full time Nature Bound Africa safari guides have been vaccinated against Covid-19.

Much of your time on safari will be socially distanced from other travelers and outside. However, if you plan to travel in a more populous area (city or town), we recommend being masked when social distancing cannot be maintained.

Departing Tanzania

Prior to departing Tanzania, Covid-19 testing (PCR and/or Rapid Test) will be required for most travelers. Please study the requirements of your airline and international airport(s) carefully. Covid-19 testing costs (PCR Test $50+facility fees pp / PCR Test on Zanzibar $80 pp / Rapid Test $10 pp) are the responsibility of the traveler. As your tour operator, we will help coordinate proper test timing, location, and test payment.

PCR Test Procedures (General and dependent upon destination country requirements):

PCR Tests should be administered no more than 3 days prior to your scheduled departure (dependent upon airline and destination rules)

Your Final Summary Schedule will indicate the date when your test should administered.

Scheduling – Nature Bound Africa will register you for your PCR test no less than 5 days prior to the test date on https://pimacovid.moh.go.tz/#/booking (for mainland / northern safari circuit locations) or  https://zanzibarcovidtesting.co.tz/app/home (for Zanzibar)

Testing sites will vary based on your specific travel itinerary

Testing Fee Payment (Mainland) – Once your appointment has been made, our staff in Arusha will receive your testing payment Control Number (unique number for each traveler). We will make the payment on your behalf and you will reimburse this cost to your guide ($50 per person – cash). Since test requirements are subject to change, reimbursement on site will be the most accurate approach.

Testing Fee Payment (Zanzibar) – Once your appointment has been made we will prepay for the test and then forward your test scheduling confirmation on Zanzibar. The location of the test will be based on where you are staying on the island. There are facilities on the east coast as well as in Stone Town. The cost of the test on Zanzibar is $80 per person.

Facility Fee Payment – You will be responsible for the facility fee that will be paid on site. This fee will range from $10-20 per person depending on the testing facility.

Testing Procedure (day of) –

Masks are required at the testing sites.

Have your passport available for check in as well as payment confirmation (provided by your guide).

Sample collection will take place in the morning. Test collection hours vary at each site.

Please expect the process to take anywhere from 30 minutes to 1 hour.

Results – Once the testing process is complete and the certificate is ready, a notification with your results and certificate will be sent from the National Public Health Laboratory – Tanzania (covid19certificate@afya.go.tz) to the email address used during registration (usually your safari consultant’s email unless otherwise specified). You may also check https://pimacovid.moh.go.tz/#/booking (for mainland / northern safari circuit locations) or  https://zanzibarcovidtesting.co.tz/app/home (for Zanzibar) for updates using your passport number to pull up your results. Please note that once the sample leaves the testing site, the testing site will not receive information about results. Should you have any concerns please ask your guide to contact the Regional Laboratory Technologist at +255 713 819 450 (Warda) or +255 715 361 518 (Nangai).

  • For travelers departing JRO, a printed copy of your test result will be given to you in Arusha. We will also email you a PDF of the certificate.
  • For travelers departing DAR or ZNZ, we will email you a PDF of the certificate.

Note for travelers returning to the United States :

Before boarding a flight to the United States, you are required to show a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 1 day before travel.

Children under 2 years old do not need to test. There is also an option for people who have documented recovery from COVID-19 in the past 90 days. Learn more about these requirements.

This regulation goes into December 6, 2021.

Rapid Test Procedures (updated August 23, 2021)

  • If you are departing on an airline that requires or accepts a Rapid Test prior to boarding you need to arrive at your international airport of departure at least 4 hours prior to departure.
  • All international airports (JRO, DAR and ZNZ) have Rapid Test capacity.
  • Pre-registration is not required
  • Payment of $10 can be made in cash by depositing into the on-site bank.
  • Results are provided within 15 to 20 minutes of taking the test.
  • UPDATE: A negative COVID-19 test is not required for transiting passengers in Amsterdam (AMS) who do not leave the airport and whose connection time is within 1 day. However, it is strongly encouraged to use the Delta Discover Map to verify the entry requirements of your final destination, as your final destination may require you to have a negative COVID-19 test.
Common PCR Testing Sites in the Northern Circuit

 Arusha Region:

  • Arusha Lutheran Center Referral Hospital – daily – $25 USD (cash)
  • You can request to have someone come to you to administer the test (this should be pre-arranged)
  • Mt. Meru Regional Referral Hospital – 8 am – 3:30 pm daily
  • FAME Medical Health Center – 8:30 am – 11:30 am daily – $15 USD (cash or credit accepted)

Mara Region

  • Seronera Airstrip (Musoma Regional Referral Hospital) – 7:00 – 10:00 am daily – 20,000 Tshillings (approx $8.60)
  • Kogatende Airstrip (Musoma Regional Referral Hospital) – 8:00 – 10:00 am daily – 20,000 Tshillings (approx $8.60)

Zanzibar

  • Global Hospital (Stone Town) – 7:30 am – 2:30 pm M-Sat, 8 am – 12 pm Sun
  • Testing sites on East Coast of Zanzibar  – 7:30 am – 2:30 pm M-Sat, 8 am – 12 pm Sun

For additional information you can also reference the US Embassy websites or the following PDF documents issued by Tanzania and Rwanda respectively.

United States Embassy – Tanzania

United States Embassy – Kenya

Covid-19 Regulations – Kenya – Website

going on safari

Going on safari

Going on safari

But what is ‘going on safari’ actually, what does it mean to book a trip to Tanzania or Kenya? The word safari means ‘journey’ or ‘to travel’ in Swahili, the local language in both Tanzania and Kenya. The online Oxford dictionary gives the definition of safari as: ‘An expedition to observe or hunt animals in their natural habitat, especially in East Africa.’

In the colonial days safari was used to describe the big hunting trips, but nowadays it’s more commonly used to describe a trip to a wildlife area and watching animals in their natural environment. Only the predators now do the hunting, although you could say that when you are on safari you ‘hunt’ for photographs.

The motto for safaris nowadays is;

Game drive starts early in the morning, heading back to the lodge in afternoon for lunch and relaxing at the lodge before heading out again for a late afternoon game drive. Or you can take a picnic breakfast or lunch (or both!), and head out for a long day of spotting animals with scenic stops to enjoy your breakfast or lunch out of the car. At night there is usually a campfire to sit around and share your stories and gaze at the stars.

Many people on family holiday safari, solo travel, group travel and honeymoon clients book a flight to Nairobi in Kenya as this is a bigger hub and more international airlines fly there which means there are more options and cheaper flights available. From Nairobi, you can either book another flight to for example Arusha or Kilimanjaro International Airport in Tanzania or fly directly to your destination in Kenya with a smaller domestic flight. Driving to your destination in the country of your choice is of course also an option and will help keep the safari cheaper if you are on a budget.

Lake Eyasi

Lake Eyasi

Lake Eyasi is a seasonal shallow endorheic salt lake on the floor of the Great Rift Valley at the base of the Serengeti Plateau, just south of the Serengeti National Park and immediately southwest of the Ngorongoro Crater in the Crater Highlands of Tanzania. The lake is elongated, orientated southwest to northeast, and lies in the Eyasi-Wembere branch of the Great Rift Valley.

Lake Eyasi

The Hadzabe bushmen live in this region, as do the Datoga and Mbulu tribes. A visit with the bushmen is worthwhile and they will graciously show you where and how they live and hunt. They subsist entirely off the bush and by bow hunting. Everything they use is made from local materials, including their bows which are strung with giraffe tendon and their arrows which are coated in lethal poison. Their language resembles that of Kalahari bushmen tribe (who were featured in the 1980 film ‘The Gods Must Be Crazy’) with clicking noises used.

The Datoga and Mbulu people are pastoralists, like the Masai people.

The scenery of Lake Eyasi differs dramatically to that of the surrounding areas. Compared to the Serengeti and Ngorongoro Highlands this area seems downright tropical. Palm trees border the lake and make homes for birds such as Fischer’s lovebird. Other trees in this area include the umbrella thorn acacia and sand paper bush. The weather is nearly always very hot and intense, as the lake is located in floor of the Rift Valley, the oldest rift in the world. The rift is thought to have opened over 65 million years ago, shortly after dinosaurs became extinct. To view Lake Eyasi on our Tanzania map please click here.

Lake Eyasi’s water levels vary greatly between the rainy and dry seasons. During the dry season the lake is virtually nonexistent and animals are forced to share what water is left, which makes for easier wildlife viewing. The lake can get quite deep during the rainy season and it attracts hippos who like to cool off in its brackish waters.

Bird lovers will be in paradise here, as the lake attracts vast numbers of birds of all sizes and colors. Some main birds to be found here include: Africa spoonbill, flamingos, gray headed gulls, great white pelicans, pied avocet and yellow-billed storks. The main fish found in the lake are catfish and lungfish.

Lake eysai palm trees sunset this region is particularly suited for exploring on foot, and day or half day hikes are highly recommended. It is also possible to go on a hunting trip with the Hadzabe or to visit the other tribes. Almost any time of year is a good time to visit Lake Eyasi with only April and May being questionable as they are when the long rains occur.

Olduvai Gorge & Laetoli

Olduvai Gorge & Laetoli

Olduvai Gorge & Laetoli over the last thirty years or so, it has become increasingly apparent that Africa is probably the “Cradle of Mankind“. From Africa they spread out to populate the rest of Earth. Remains of the earliest humans were found in Oldupai Gorge.

 

Olduvai Gorge & Laetoli

Olduvai Gorge is a site in Tanzania that holds the earliest evidence of the existence of human ancestors. Paleoanthropologists have found hundreds of fossilized bones and stone tools in the area dating back millions of years, leading them to conclude that humans evolved in Africa.

Olduvai is a misspelling of Oldupai, a Maasai word for a wild sisal plant that grows in the area. The gorge is located in the Great Rift Valley, between the Ngorongoro Crater and the Serengeti National Park. It is 30 miles from Laetoli, another fossil-rich area. Olduvai Gorge was formed about 30,000 years ago, the result of aggressive geological activity and streams.

The steep ravine is about 30 miles (48.2 km) long and 295 feet (89.9 meters) deep, not quite large enough to be classified as a canyon. A river cuts through several layers to form four individual beds, with the oldest estimated at about 2 million years old.

At Laetoli, west of Ngorongoro Crater, hominid footprints are preserved in volcanic rock 3.6 millions years old and represent some of the earliest signs of mankind in the world. Three separate tracks of a small-brained upright walking early hominid. Australopithecus afarensis, a creature about 1.2 to 1.4 meters high, were found. Imprints of these are displayed in the Oldupai museum.

More advanced descendants of Laetoli’s hominids were found further north, buried in the layers of the 100 meters deep Oldupai Gorge. Excavations, mainly by the archaeologist Louis and Mary Leakey, yielded four different kinds of hominid, showing a gradual increases in brain size and in the complexity of their stone tools. The first skull of Zinjanthropus, commonly known as ‘Nutcracker Man’ who lived about 1.75 millions years ago, was found here. The most important find include Home habilis, Zinjathropus and the Laetoli footprints.

Mafia Island Marine Park

Mafia Island Marine Park

Mafia Island Marine Park is renowned as an excellent world-class diving destination with some of the richest reefs in the world, The park covers the Southern part of Mafia Island and includes the inhabited islands of Chole, Juani Jibondo and Bwejuu and several uninhabited islets and the associated waters.

Mafia Island Marine Park

Mafia Island Marine Park and its chain of small islets lie approximately 120 km south of Dar es Salaam and 20 km offshore from the eastern extent of the Rufiji is one of the largest delta systems in Africa. To the east of Mafia Island is the Indian Ocean. The main island of Mafia is about 48 km long and 17 km wide at its widest point. Several smaller islands and islets are scattered to the west and south.

The island consists of eight small reserves along the Tanzanian coast under the Fisheries (Marine Reserves) Regulations of 1975, two of these are in what is now the Mafia Island marine Park (MIMP), namely Chole Bay and Kitutia Reef.

The marine park area at Mafia Island extends across some 822km2, more than 75% of it below the high water mark. The area hosts an outstanding mosaic of tropical marine habitats including coral reefs, sea grass beds, mangroves and inter-tidal flats. In addition a remnant block of threatened lowland coastal forest survives along the eastern seaboard of the island, roughly half of it within the marine park boundary.

Two species of sea turtle use Mafia’s beaches as nesting grounds and the area has been recognized internationally as a critical site for biodiversity. Several sites of historic ruins lie within the marine park area, some dating back to the C 13th. Mafia Island’s separation from the mainland and its freedom from industrial development have ensured that its surrounding waters are some of the least contaminated in Tanzania. The marine park area has national importance as one of the few remaining reef complexes within Tanzania’s coastal waters in relatively intact condition.

Accommodation at Mafia Island

Sea Front Mafia Lodge Kilindoni Sea View Bungalows  Mafia Island Lodge  Chumbe Island Coral Park

Zanzibar Island

Zanzibar Island

Zanzibar Island is also known as the Spice Island, the beautiful island of Zanzibar on Africa’s east coast is bursting with culture and history, seemingly at odds with its idyllic geography of white-sand beaches with palms swaying lazily in the sea breeze. Together this makes Zanzibar a fabulous place to explore as well as a dream to relax and unwind.

 

Zanzibar Island

Zanzibar is the semi-autonomous part of Tanzania in East Africa. It is composed of the Zanzibar Archipelago in the Indian Ocean, 25–50 kilometres (16–31 mi) off the coast of the mainland, and consists of many small islands and two large ones: Unguja (the main island, referred to informally as Zanzibar) and Pemba. The capital is Zanzibar City, located on the island of Unguja. Its historic centre is Stone Town, which is a World Heritage Site.

Portuguese invasion and control of the Swahili Coast in the late 16th century ended the golden age of the archipelago, although the Omani Arabs returned to power less than a century later. Today, many of the winding streets and high townhouses of old Stone Town remain unchanged and visitors can walk between the sultan’s palace, the House of Wonders, the Portuguese fort and gardens, the merchants’ houses, and the Turkish baths of the old city. Day-long spice tours to working plantations offer visitors the chance to observe the cultivation of cloves, vanilla, nutmeg, cinnamon, and other spices that have made the island famous.

Zanzibar’s coastline offers some of the best beaches in the world, but sand and surf vary depending on what side of the island you’re on. On the east coast, waves break over coral reefs and sand bars offshore, and low tide reveals small pools of starfish, small minnows, and anemones. Up north, ocean swimming is much less susceptible to the tides, and smooth beaches and white sand make for dazzling days in the sun.

The port city of Stone Town dominates the west coast, and although the beaches of Mangapwani, where slave caves are visible at low tide and nearby Bububu are less than half an hour’s drive away, a night or two spent on the east or north cost is well worth the extra hour it takes to drive there. That said, the Chole Island Marine Park just off Stone Town – and nearby Prison, Grave, and Snake Islands – make a refreshing day-trip and a good break from exploring the winding passageways of the old city.

On the south coast of Zanzibar lies the Menai Bay Conservation Area, a sea turtle protection area for the endangered species that come to breed on the island. Roads to the southeast coast take visitors through the Jozani Forest, home to Zanzibar’s rare Red Colobus monkeys and a number of other primate and small antelope species.

Lake Victoria

Lake Victoria

With a surface area of 68,800 sq km (26,600 sq mi), Lake Victoria is Africa’s largest lake. In addition, it’s the largest tropical lake in the world, and the planet’s second largest freshwater lake. Only North America’s Lake Superior is larger.

Lake Victoria

An irregular quadrilateral in shape, its shores, save on the west, are deeply indented. Its greatest length from north to south is 210 miles (337 km), its greatest breadth 150 miles (240 km). Its coastline exceeds 2,000 miles (3,220 km). Its waters fill a shallow depression in the centre of the great plateau that stretches between the Western and Eastern Rift Valleys.

The lake’s surface is 3,720 feet (1,134 metres) above sea level, and its greatest ascertained depth is 270 feet (82 metres). Many archipelagos are contained within the lake, as are numerous reefs, often just below the surface of the clear waters. Lake Victoria has more than 200 species of fish, of which the Tilapia is the most economically important. The lake’s basin area covers 92,240 square miles (238,900 square km).

The lake’s shores vary in aspect. The lake’s southwestern coast is backed by precipices 300 feet (90 metres) high, which give way on the western coast to papyrus and ambatch swamps marking the delta of the Kagera River. The lake’s deeply indented northern coast is flat and bare. A narrow channel leads into the Kavirondo Gulf, which has an average width of 16 miles (25 km) and extends for 40 miles (64 km) eastward to Kisumu, Kenya.

The Ugandan cities of Kampala and Entebbe lie along or near the northern coast. At the lake’s southeastern corner is Speke Gulf, and at the southwestern corner Emin Pasha Gulf. Of the numerous islands in the lake, Ukerewe, north of Speke Gulf, is the largest, with wooded hills rising 650 feet (200 metres) above the lake. It is densely populated. At the lake’s northwestern corner are the 62 islands of the Sese archipelago, some of them of striking beauty.

The Kagera River, the largest and most important of the lake affluents, enters the western side of Lake Victoria just north of latitude 1° S. The only other river of note entering from the west is the Katonga, north of Kagera. The lake’s only outlet is the Victoria Nile, which exits from the northern coast.

The search by Europeans for the source of the Nile led to the sighting of the lake by the British explorer John Hanning Speke in 1858. Formerly known to the Arabs as Ukerewe, the lake was named by Speke in honour of Queen Victoria of England.

A detailed survey of the lake was made by Sir William Garstin in 1901. Plans for gradually raising the level of the lake’s waters were completed in 1954 with the construction of the Owen Falls Dam (now the Nalubaale Dam) on the Victoria Nile at Jinja, Uganda. The dam provides hydroelectric power on a large scale and made the lake a vast reservoir. A second dam, Kiira, was later constructed 0.6 mile (1 km) from Nalubaale. It was completed in 1999 and began producing hydroelectric power the next year.

The Lake Victoria region is one of the most densely populated in Africa; within 50 miles (80 km) of its shores live several million people, nearly all Bantu-speaking. There are local steamer services around the lake.

Arusha City

Arusha City

Arusha City

Arusha city is located in the northern highlands of Tanzania, beneath the twin peaks of Mount Meru and Mount Kilimanjaro, Arusha is the safari capital of the country. Guests embarking on the popular northern safari circuit all stop in the ‘Geneva of Africa’ to prepare for their journeys into the African bush.

From is two-lane streets, the dramatic crater of Mt. Meru stands over the town like a majestic sentinel, it’s crater strewn with thick clouds, it’s slopes dark with verdant forest. Arusha’s ideal location near the major national parks and it’s highland setting make it a peaceful idyll of relaxation before the start of an exciting journey.

Built by the Germans as a centre of colonial administration administration in the early 20th century, Arusha was a sleepy town with a garrison stationed at the old boma and a few shops around a grassy roundabout. From its backwater status amidst the farmlands and plantations of northern Tanzania, today Arusha is one of the country’s most prosperous towns.

Arusha is a major international diplomatic hub. The city hosts and is regarded as the de facto capital of the East African Community. Since 1994, the city has also hosted the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. It is a multicultural city with a majority Tanzanian population of mixed backgrounds: indigenous Bantu, Arab-Tanzanian and Indian-Tanzanian population, plus small White European and white American minority population. Religions of the Arushan population are Christian, Jewish, Muslim, and Hindu.

The current site of Arusha was first settled in the 1830s by the agro-pastoral Arusha Maasai from the Arusha Chini community, south of Mount Kilimanjaro. They traded grains, honey, beer, and tobacco with the pastoral Kisongo Maasai in exchange for livestock, milk, meat, and skins.

Demand for Arusha’s foodstuffs increased substantially during the 1860s when the Pangani Valley trade route was extended through Old Moshi, Arusha, and ultimately to western Kenya. Although it was not yet a town, it was a regional centre and had a number of urban features.

Despite its proximity to the equator, Arusha’s elevation of 1,400 metres (4,600 ft) on the southern slopes of Mount Meru keeps temperatures relatively low and alleviates humidity. Cool dry air is prevalent for much of the year.

The temperature ranges between 13 and 30 degrees Celsius with an average around 25 degrees. It has distinct wet and dry seasons, and experiences an eastern prevailing wind from the Indian Ocean, a couple of hundred miles east.

Budget friendly accommodation for groups, families, backpackers, longstay etc – We recommend Maura HomeStay

Burunge WMA

Burunge WMA

Burunge WMA

BURUNGE WMA is located in Babati District, Manyara Region along Arusha-Babati-Singida-Dodoma highway, about 120 kilometres from tourist city of Arusha. Home to elephants and Giant Baobab trees

BURUNGE WMA is located in Babati District, Manyara Region along Arusha-Babati-Singida-Dodoma highway, about 120 kilometres from tourist city of Arusha.

The WMA is made up of nine villages from three administrative wards whose revenue from tourism and conservation is sent back to support the local communities to execute social and economic development activities.

Villages which had allocated their land for establishment of the WMA are Sangawe, Mwada, Vilima Vitatu, Ngoley, Kakoi, Olasiti, Manyara, Maweni and Magara.

Burunge WMA is accessible by road transport from Arusha to Makuyuni, a distance of 85 kilometres, then from Makuyuni to the WMA is located about 35 kilometres, between Makuyuni junction and Babati town.
The WMA borders Tarangire and Lake Manyara National parks, which together share the rich wildlife resources living in those two famous national parks in Northern Tanzania. It is 18 kilometres from the Tarangire National park Gate and 10 kilometres from the southern boundary of Lake Manyara National Park.

The most tourist attractions found in Burunge WMA are mostly the wildlife from Tarangire and Lake Manyara National Parks, mostly elephants and other mammals seen in northern Tanzanian parks including the Big Five.

Burunge is as well, famous for its big population of pythons which are rarely found in most wildlife parks in East Africa. Animals migrating as far from Serengeti National Park and Ngorongoro Conservation Area have been spotted in the WMA and added its conservation prominence.

Other than wildlife, the WMA is famous for flamingo and hippo watching in Lake Burunge, sunset over the Tarangire National Park, baobab trees dated over thousand years and seasonal migration of Zebras, Giraffes, Waterbucks, Buffaloes ,Lions, Leopards and other attractive animals from Serengeti, Ngorongoro, Lake Manyara and Tarangire wildlife parks.

Burunge WMA is as well, famous for harbouring elephants with bigger and longer tusks not found in any part of Africa. Visitors to this WMA can enjoy watching more than 200 bird species found inside the community conserved forest which makes the WMA unique.

Burunge WMA has been divided into six blocks and which each investor pay US$ 60,000 as block fee per year, and which 75 percent of the total amount is sent back to local communities through the WMA management. All investors are carrying out photographic safari, since no hunting safari in this WMA.

Tourist activities in the WMA are mostly photographic safaris organised by tour operators. Bicycle riding and walking safaris inside the WMA are the other organized tourist activities taking place there during early morning hours and late afternoons.

Tourist accommodation and recreational services are offered in lodges and camps established inside Burunge WMA. These are Tarangire River Camp,  Tarangire Osupuko Lodge, Maramboi, Chemchem Lodge, Lake Burunge Tented Lodge, UN Lodge and Little Chemchem Lodge.

Little Chemchem Lodge is located closer to Lake Burunge at a place full of wild animals. Some animals seen around there are Giraffes, Zebras, Gazelles, Dik Diks, Warthogs, Elephants, Buffaloes and Lions.

Cultural performances can be organized through traditional dances from the Maasai and Wambugwe groups made up of women and men. Two Cultural Dancing groups have been established in Burunge WMA to entertain visitors booked in lodges and camps within the WMA.

These Groups are “Pevingo Dancing Group” which is made up of men and women, and “Mshikamano Women Group”. Pevingo Dancing Group is made up of 20 traditional dancers from Wambugwe community, among them15 dancers are men and the rest five are women.

Most songs composed do carry wildlife conservation messages to attract local communities involvement in wildlife conservation, while campaigning for anti-poaching and environmental protection, also strengthening good neighbourliness with Tarangire National Park.

Mshikamano Women Group was launched in 2004 as an initiative of 30 women members, all engaged on various cultural activities. The group do organize traditional dances to visitors (tourists) booked in lodges within the WMA.

It is an economic generating group as well, specialized in weaving of various, attractive ornaments and utensils using the grass. Among the products are trays, dustbins, table mats, small containers, foods covers and also various home utensils.

Mgungani Women Group is the other local community initiative to raise incomes of women through gains in tourism and wildlife conservation. The group was formed in 1997 by 50 Maasai women entrepreneurs through 10 Village Cooperative Banks (VICOBA).

Located near the entry gate to Tarangire National Park, the group sell ornaments and decorations to tourists calling in the park. Other women groups in Burunge WMA are Einoti Maasai Women Group and Tarangire Emanyata, all specialised on cultural activities.

Enduimet WMA

Enduimet WMA

Enduimet WMA

LOCATED in Longido District on the Basin land of the western foothills of Mount Kilimanjaro, Enduimet Wildlife Management Area (WMA) was established in 2003 with land allocated by nine villages covering an area of 1,282 kilometres.

The Small Garden of Eden, home to biggest elephants in East Africa.
LOCATED in Longido District on the Basin land of the western foothills of Mount Kilimanjaro, Enduimet Wildlife Management Area (WMA) was established in 2003 with land allocated by nine villages covering an area of 1,282 kilometres.

The Enduimet WMA shares its border with Kilimanjaro National Park to the southeast, Engarusai Open Area to the west and the Kenyan border to the north.

Enduimet WMA sets a good example of a community based conservation area where local Maasai pastoralists are benefiting from tourism and conservation initiatives.

The conserved area occupies the Ol Molog and Tinga Tinga wards in Longido district in Arusha region and is occupied wholly by Maasai pastoral communities. Its operation office is located at Ol Molog ward in on the closer slopes of Mount Kilimanjaro.

Engasurai Open Area is the main attractive geographical feature within Enduimet WMA where animals frequently move to in search for water and hunting ground for predators.

Photographic safaris is the most and well established tourist activity in Enduimet and where tourists from various parts of the world flock to view wild animals. The Kitendeni Corridor is located within the WMA and is a migration route for animals roving between Tsavo West, Mkomazi, Kilimanjaro and Amboseli National parks in Tanzania and Kenya.

Enduimet WMA is divided into three zones of Olkunonoi-Kitendeni
Wildlife Corridor Zone, the Engasurai Tourist Hunting Zone and the Sinya Photographic Safari Zone.  It comprises as well, the northern portion of the larger Kitendeni Wildlife Corridor, which is critical to the survival of both Kilimanjaro and Amboseli National Parks. The corridor serves as an important seasonal migration route and dispersal area for wildebeest, zebras and elephants moving between the two national parks.

The Zones are currently running photographic safaris since no tourist hunting taking place in the whole of Enduimet WMA’s conserved land. With a purpose to conserve Enduimet WMA as a part of the Kilimanjaro and Amboseli ecosystem, no trophy hunting business taking place in this area.
The conserved Area has a very unique and extensive plains ecosystem that is home to an abundance of wildlife and is the only WMA that protects a transboundary corridor between Kilimanjaro and Amboseli National Parks.

Ecologically, the WMA provides connectivity between the Mkomazi, Arusha, Amboseli and Kilimanjaro National Parks and the Greater Tsavo Ecosystem in Kenya.

Enduiment Wildlife Management is endowed with numerous tourist attractions.  Wildlife including giraffes, Thomson gazelles, zebras, and wildebeest, some concentrated at Engasurai plain and which looks like Ngorongoro Crater, commonly referred as “The Small Garden of Eden”.

Elephants, Oryx, Zebras, Giraffes, Lions, Buffaloes, Leopards, Elands, Wildebeests, Hyenas and other African big mammals can easily been seen in the WMA and Sinya, a private concession of about 600 square km, bordering Kenya in Amboseli National Park, offering spectacular landscapes with magnificent views of Kilimanjaro, Mount Meru, Ol Doinyo Longido and Ol Doinyo Orok.  Enduimet is a home to biggest elephants in East Africa.

Other tourist attractions including the “Seven Hill Sisters”: These are small hills located within the Enduimet WMA, each with different heights, but standing together, looking like sisters from one parent, born at different dates.

Cultural Tourism is another tourist activity in Enduimet WMA. Maasai Bomas provide cultural entertainment through traditional Maasai songs and ways of life among the Maasai communities like meat roasting (Nyama Choma), milking cows and folklores. Tourist walking safaris and bush camping safaris can be arranged as well.

Tourist accommodation and recreational services are offered at different lodges and camps established inside Enduimet WMA. These are Elerai Tented Lodge,  Shuma’ta Camp, Tembo Camp and Chui Campsite.

Best time to visit Enduimet WMA is in November when the entire area is full green, but visitors can book and visit there all the year round.  Foreign visitors are charged dollars 10 (US$ 10) as fees to enter and spend a day inside the WMA. Local tourists are charged Sh. 1,000 per day for adults and Sh 500 for children.
Access to Enduimet WMA is easy and possible all the year, except during rainy seasons when some roads and tourist tracks inside the WMA are not passable.

Enduimet WMA is connected by a rough road from Longido District Headquarters. The distance from Arusha City to Longido District Headquarters is 77 kilometres, while from Longido to Enduimet WMA gate is 25 kilometres.

From Enduimet to Arusha via Sanya Juu and Bomang’ombe is 120 kilometres and takes up to 3 hours by bus or a car. Tourists travelling from Arusha, Nairobi and Moshi could either use this road to connect from the Arusha to Nairobi highway.
The WMA can also be reached using a gravel road from Bomang’ombe through Sanya Juu and Engare Nairobi or the rough road from Arusha to Namanga road through Longido village to Sinya, Ngereiyani and Tingatinga.
Going there by a passenger bus, a visitor can board a mini-bus from Arusha to Bomang’ombe, then Bomang’ombe to Sanya Juu then and Ol Molog where the WMA’s operations office is located.