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Kenya

Kenya Wildlife Safari National Parks 

Kenya Wildlife Safari National Parks unnamed Copy Kenya Wildlife Safari National Parks 

Africa’s famous “Big Five”

Kenya is home to Africa’s famous “Big Five” (Lion, Elephant, Rhino, Leopard and Buffalo) Kenya is the best place in the entire continent to see these Five magnificent species in their natural environment. Furthermore, Kenya has an incredible range of wild habitats, each one with its own unique range of species. Open savannah, deep forest, soda and freshwater lakes, alpine meadows, coral reefs, caves, beaches, river deltas and even more.

Finest Natural Attractions

Kenya also offers some of the finest natural attractions in the world including the seventh natural wonder of the world, the wildebeest migration that starts from July of every year combined with an excellent network of hotels and game lodges that give visitors value for business and pleasure.

Kenya Wildlife Service Parks and Reserves

With her national parks, game reserves, marine parks, biosphere reserves, archaeological sites, pearly beaches and flora fauna, Kenya is a natural tourism magnet and renown for her Safaris. The most popular attractions are wildlife at national parks. Please find the list below of the National Parks and Reserves.

 » Aberdare National Park» Arabuko Sokoke Forest Reserve

» Chyulu Hills National Park

» Kakamega Forest National Reserve

» Kisumu Impala Sanctuary

» Kora National Park

» Malindi Marine National Park

» Marsabit National Park & Reserve

» Mombasa Marine National Park

» Mount Elgon National Park

» Mt. Longonot National Park

» Nairobi National Park

» Ol Donyo Sabuk National Park

» Saiwa Swamp National Park

» Sibiloi National Park

» Tsavo East National Park

» Watamu Marine National Reserve

 » Amboseli National Park» Central Island National Park

» Hells Gate National Park

» Kisite Mpunguti Marine Park

» Kiunga National Marine Reserve

» Lake Nakuru National Park

» Malka Mari National Park

» Meru National Park

» Mombasa Marine Reserve

» Mt. Kenya National Park

» Mwea National Reserve

» Ndere Island National Park

» Ruma National Park

» Shimba Hills National Reserve

» Tana River Primate Reserve

» Tsavo West National Park

 

Photography tips: How to shoot motion

Motion blur may be a little passé these days but, done well, this easy-to-master technique can transform travel and wildlife images into masterpieces.

When you take a picture, light reflecting from the subject hits the camera’s sensor and is recorded. If the shutter opens and closes very quickly, there’s no time for light from moving portions of your image to “˜smear’ across the pixels of your sensor. However, as shutter speed slows, the “˜smear’ of light increases. Many photographers use this to make fantastic images.

With moving subjects, shooting slow exposures from a tripod can emphasise the movement of your subject relative to its background. The subject in motion is blurred while all around it is pin sharp. Think of those shots you may have seen of ghost-like waterfalls and rivers.

Pan with your subjects

Another simple technique is to pan with or follow your subjects. This means that, relative to your camera, the subject in motion is steady and the background is moving. Consequently, the subject in motion is sharp while the background is completely blurred. Think of wildlife photographers shooting moving animals or herds, or motoring journalists trying to emphasise the speed of a car. Ironically many of the motion shots used in car adverts are shot using very slow exposures while pushing the car by hand.

The amount of blur is dependent on four factors:

    • The angle of motion relative to the camera: subjects moving perpendicular to the lens blur more than subjects moving towards the lens.

 

    • Speed of the subject: the faster the subject, the more it blurs.

 

    • Magnification of the lens: the bigger the focal length of the lens, the more the subject will blur.

 

  • Distance from the lens: the closer a subject is to the lens, the more it blurs.
Do it yourself

Firstly, find a suitable subject; cars passing on a road in the early evening work well. Set your camera to aperture priority and select a high f-stop (a small aperture – try f11 and above) that results in slow shutter speed. See below for the shutter speeds at which certain subjects will begin to blur.

Try both techniques. With your camera on a tripod, shoot scenes of passing cars and watch how they blur and the lights streak. Next take your camera off your tripod and pan evenly with your subject as it passes, snapping shots as you go.

Guideline shutter speeds

Approximate shutter speeds for a short zoom lens – 55 to 90 mm – that will begin to blur on a subject moving at the following speeds approximately 30 metres away.

Walking 1/30th
Running 1/60th
60 km/h 1/125th
120 km/h 1/250th

How to take the perfect holiday photograph

How to take the perfect holiday photograph

tree climbing lions How to take the perfect holiday photograph

Follow a few simple tips to eradicate blurred sunsets and headless family members in your travel snaps

Even the best holiday memories fade – but photographs never do. At least, not these days with digital technology enabling us all to keep those happy snaps forever. But what if you struggle to take pictures you’ll want to treasure? Do you always chop people’s heads off, or end up with out of focus landscapes? Read on and let a professional show you how it’s done.

Invest in your camera
Don’t scrimp on time or cash when choosing the right camera. Do your research whether you are buying a full digital SLR, a compact camera or even just using a smartphone as your main travel camera. There is no going back, so read the reviews and go into a store to ask questions face to face even if you later buy online.

Get all the gear
You’ve got your camera, but make sure to get all the other bits and bobs you might need on the road; that means spare memory cards, lens-cleaning cloths and, most importantly, a spare battery. Ignore this advice at your peril – you’ll remember it ruefully when a lion vaults over your safari truck just after your battery dies.

Stabilise that image
So many gorgeous sunrise and sunset shots, as well as many landscape images, work best with a tripod. You don’t need a huge man-sized tripod rig that takes out passers by as you turn corners. There are plenty of compact tripods these days and you can even buy tiny little tripods for smartphones.

Compose
Compose, compose and then compose some more. Don’t just snap dull shots of the Eiffel Tower. Think about closing in and shooting some of the detail, or adding some people for extra interest – and use whatever light you have. Put simply, the more effort and time you put into composition, the better your pictures will be.

People not ants
When you are shooting photographs that aim to sum up the spirit of a great holiday don’t have the stars of the show standing miles away. Even if the backdrop is dramatic the people are the main focus here and you want to capture their enjoyment, even if they are a little camera shy, so bring them into the foreground.

Tell a story
Home in on details to tell the story of a place. For a market, first shoot a wide shot from a distance to set the scene, then move in slowly, finishing with close-ups of food and dashes of local prices or language to add more colour. You should have everything you need now to make a great montage for your wall back home.

Get techie
If you have invested in an expensive DSLR don’t just rely on the automatic modes. Get creative and experiment with various combinations of ISO settings and different shutter speeds. This will enable you to take more sophisticated photographs, as well as meaning you can call yourself a “proper photographer”.

African Destinations To Visit

African Destinations To Visit

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Africa is blessed with amazing natural treasures and we hope you’ll find these destinations and events interesting and tempting to explore.

1. Bwindi Impenetrable National Park (Uganda).

The park is part of the Bwindi Impenetrable Forest and is situated along the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) border next to the Virunga National Park. The park provides habitat for 120 species of mammals, 348 species of birds, 220 species of butterflies, 27 species of frogs, chameleons, geckos, and many endangered species.

2. Mosi-oa-Tunya/Victoria Falls (Zambia and Zimbabwe).

One of the biggest tourist attractions in Africa, Victoria Falls is undoubtedly amongst the most spectacular waterfalls in the world. Located on the mighty Zambezi River, Victoria Falls is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and it is one of the largest waterfalls in the world.

3. Wildebeest migration (Kenya and Tanzania).

Certainly a must see, the migration is considered one of nature’s great spectacles and sees over a million wildebeest trek north from the Serengeti (Tanzania) to the Maasai Mara (Kenya). The wildebeests are joined on this epic journey by thousands of eland, gazelle and zebra as they cross the crocodile-infested Mara River to graze on the Maasai Mara plains.

4. Bazaruto Archipelago (Mozambique)

Is a group of six islands. Bazaruto Island is the largest in the Bazaruto Archipelago and Bazaruto National Park. The archipelago is certainly a beautiful destination which needs to be explored. The archipelago  boasts of by a wide array of marine and wildlife, azure waters and amazing beaches.

5. Ennedi Massif (Chad).
Ennedi Massif: Natural and Cultural Landscape, which was recently named one of UNESCO’s Newest World Heritage Sites. This sandstone landscape is one of the world’s finest examples of rock art and carvings. Ennedi Massif has been sculpted by water and wind erosion over time into a plateau featuring canyons and valleys that present a spectacular landscape marked by cliffs, natural arches and pitons. The site is indeed a cultural treasure.
6. Sanganeb Marine National Park and Dungonab Bay

Mukkawar Island Marine National Park (Sudan) recently inscribed as one of UNESCO’s Newest World Heritage Sites. Sanganeb is a coral atoll 25km off the coast of Sudan. Sanganeb National Park is indeed a marvel. Dungonab Bay is another remarkable marine treasure, which provides a habitat for large populations of seabirds, marine mammals, fish, sharks, and turtles.

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7. National Arts Festival (South Africa)

One of the most important events on the South African cultural calendar, and undoubtedly one of the biggest arts events on the African continent. Starting at the end of June/beginning of July, it runs for between 8 and 10 days and is held in the small university city of Grahamstown. The programme comprises drama, dance, physical theatre, comedy, opera, music, jazz, visual art exhibitions, film, student theatre, street theatre, lectures, craft fair, workshops, and a children’s arts festival.

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8. Erin Ijesha Waterfalls(Nigeria)

is also known as Olumirin waterfalls. A visit to Nigeria is not complete for a tourist without a visit to Erin-Ijesa because it’s the popular and most visited tourist attraction in Nigeria. Olumirin is a seven step waterfall and each step of the waterfall has a flowing fountain that marks the mystical nature of the place. The waterfall is a stunning assemblage of seven unique levels, with each level providing a whole new outlook when compared to the previous level. The water fall exudes a therapeutic ambience which only something natural can produce.

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Best Time to Visit Kenya Safaris

Best Time to Visit Kenya Safaris

Baby Cheetah in Masai Mara National Reserve Kenya Africa 1 Best Time to Visit Kenya Safaris

Kenya the best wildlife viewing months in Kenya are during the dry season from late June to October. The wildebeest migration reaches the Masai Mara in July and remains until October when they move back to the Serengeti in Tanzania. Wildlife viewing is good year-round, but this can differ for some parks. See below to learn when to visit which park.

Quick facts
Best time to go: June to October, January to February (Other, drier parks)
High Season: July to November, January and February (Some of the parks get very crowded especially the Masai Mara, Amboseli and Lake Nakuru)
Low Season: March to May (Some lodges and camps in high rainfall areas close down)
Best Weather: June to October (Little to no rainfall)
Worst Weather: March, April and May (Peak of wet season)
June to October – Dry Season
 
  • Wildlife is easier to spot because the bush is less dense and animals gather around waterholes and rivers.
  • It’s unlikely to rain, the days are sunny with clear skies and there are less mosquitoes.
  • July to October are the best months to see the wildebeest migration.
  • It gets very busy and crowded in the most popular parks.
November to May – Wet Season
  • The scenery is beautiful and green. Rates are lower because it’s the low season.
  • Newborn animals can be seen and in general, you will still see plenty of wildlife even though it is easier to spot during the dry season.
  • Migratory birds are present from September to April.
  • Except for March, April and May, rains are short showers in the afternoon or evening and will rarely compromise your safari.
  • During March to May the rains can be continuous and, when not raining, it is often clouded. Some lodges and camps close down during part of the wet season.
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