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Mount Kilimanjaro National Park

Mount Kilimanjaro National Park

Mount Kilimanjaro National Park

Mount Kilimanjaro National Park At 5896m

Mount Kilimanjaro National Park Africa’s highest mountain and one of the continent’s magnificent sights, It has three main volcanic peaks, Kibo, Mawenzi, and Shira. The name itself “Kilimanjaro” is a mystery wreathed in clouds. It might mean Mountain of Light, Mountain of Greatness or Mountain of Caravans.

Above the gently rolling hills and plateaux of northern Tanzania rises the snowy peak of Mt. Kilimanjaro, it’s slopes and glaciers shimmering above the rising clouds. Kilimanjaro is located near the town of Moshi and is a protected area, carefully regulated for climbers to enjoy without leaving a trace of their presence. The mountain’s ecosystems are as strikingly beautiful as they are varied and diverse. On the lowland slopes, much of the mountain is farmland, with coffee, banana, cassava, and maize crops grown for subsistence and cash sale. A few larger coffee farms still exist on the lower slopes, but much of the area outside the national park has been subdivided into small plots. Once inside the park, thick lowland forest covers the lower altitudes and breaks into alpine meadows once the air begins to thin. Near the peak, the landscape is harsh and barren, with rocks and ice the predominant features above a breathtaking African view.

Climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro is the highlight of most visitors’ experiences in Tanzania. Few mountains can claim the grandeur, the breathtaking views of Amboseli National Park in Kenya, the Rift Valley, and the Masaai Steppe, that belongs to Kilimanjaro. Hiking on the ‘rooftop of Africa’ — the highest point on the continent at 5896 metres — is the adventure of a lifetime, especially because, if paced well, everyone from seasoned trekkers to first-time enthusiasts can scale the snowy peak. For more information, see the ‘Mountain Climbing‘ section under ‘Things to Do.

Kilimanjaro. The name itself is a mystery wreathed in clouds. It might mean Mountain of Light, Mountain of Greatness or Mountain of Caravans. Or it might not. The local people, the Wachagga, don’t even have a name for the whole massif, only Kipoo (now known as Kibo) for the familiar snowy peak that stands imperious, overseer of the continent, the summit of Africa.

Kilimanjaro, by any name, is a metaphor for the compelling beauty of East Africa. When you see it, you understand why. Not only is this the highest peak on the African continent; it is also the tallest free-standing mountain in the world, rising in breathtaking isolation from the surrounding coastal scrubland – elevation around 900 metres – to an imperious 5,895 metres (19,336 feet).

Climbing Certificates

Kilimanjaro is one of the world’s most accessible high summits, a beacon for visitors from around the world. Most climbers reach the crater rim with little more than a walking stick, proper clothing and determination. And those who reach Uhuru Point, the actual summit, or Gillman’s Point on the lip of the crater, will have earned their climbing certificates and their memories.

But there is so much more to Kili than her summit. The ascent of the slopes is a virtual climatic world tour, from the tropics to the Arctic. Even before you cross the national park boundary (at the 2,700m contour), the cultivated footslopes give way to lush montane forest, inhabited by elusive elephant, leopard, buffalo, the endangered Abbot’s duiker, and other small antelope and primates. Higher still lies the moorland zone, where a cover of giant heather is studded with otherworldly giant lobelias.

Above 4,000m, a surreal alpine desert supports little life other than a few hardy mosses and lichen. Then, finally, the last vestigial vegetation gives way to a winter wonderland of ice and snow – and the magnificent beauty of the roof of the continent.

About Kilimanjaro National Park

Size: 1668 sq km 641 sq miles).
Location: Northern Tanzania, near the town of Moshi.

Getting there

– 128 km (80 miles) from Arusha.
– About one hour’s drive from Kilimanjaro airport.

What to do

– Six usual trekking routes to the summit and other more-demanding mountaineering routes.
– Day or overnight hikes on the Shira plateau. Nature trails on the lower reaches.
– Trout fishing.
– Visit the beautiful Chala crater lake on the mountain’s southeastern slopes.

Accommodation

– Huts and campsites on the mountain.
– Several hotels and campsites outside the park in the village of Marangu and town of Moshi.

NOTE:

– Climb slowly to increase your acclimatisation time and maximise your chances of reaching the summit.
–  To avoid altitude sickness, allow a minimum of five nights, preferably even more for the climb. Take your time and enjoy the beauty of the mountain.

NEW RATES FOR PORTERS AND GUIDES (JUNE ’08 2021)

Porters – USD 10 per day
Cooks – USD 15 per day
Guides – USD 20 per day

Mikumi National Park

Mikumi National Park

Mikumi National Park

Mikumi is Tanzania’s fourth-largest national park. It’s also the most accessible from Dar es Salaam. With almost guaranteed wildlife sightings, it makes an ideal safari destination for those without much time.

Since the completion of the paved road connecting the park gate with Dar es Salaam, Mikumi National Park has been slated to become a hotspot for tourism in Tanzania. Located between the Uluguru Mountains and the Lumango range, Mikumi is the fourth largest national park in Tanzania and only a few hours drive from Tanzania’s largest city. The park has a wide variety of wildlife that can be easy spotted and also well acclimatized to game viewing. Its proximity to Dar es Salaam and the amount of wildlife that live within its borders makes Mikumi National Park a popular option for weekend visitors from the city, or for business visitors who don’t have to spend a long time on an extended safari itinerary.

Most visitors come to Mikumi National Park aiming to spot the ‘Big Five’ (cheetah, lion, elephant, buffalo, and rhino), and they are always not disappointed. Hippo pools provide close access to the mud-loving beasts, and bird-watching along the waterways is particularly rewarding. Mikumi National Park borders the Selous Game Reserve and Udzungwa National Park, and the three locations make a varied and pleasant safari circuit.

Swirls of opaque mist hide the advancing dawn. The first shafts of sun decorate the fluffy grass heads rippling across the plain in a russet halo. A herd of zebras, confident in their camouflage at this predatory hour, pose like ballerinas, heads aligned and stripes merging in flowing motion.

Mikumi National Park abuts the northern border of Africa’s biggest game reserve – the Selous – and is transected by the surfaced road between Dar es Salaam and Iringa. It is thus the most accessible part of a 75,000 square kilometre (47,000 square mile) tract of wilderness that stretches east almost as far as the Indian Ocean.

The open horizons and abundant wildlife of the Mkata Floodplain, the popular centre piece of Mikumi, draws frequent comparisons to the more famous Serengeti Plains.

Lions survey their grassy kingdom – and the zebra, wildebeest, impala and buffalo herds that migrate across it – from the flattened tops of termite mounds, or sometimes during the rains, from perches high in the trees. Giraffes forage in the isolated acacia stands that fringe the Mkata River, islets of shade favoured also by Mikumi’s elephants.

Criss-crossed by a good circuit of game-viewing roads, the Mkata Floodplain is perhaps the most reliable place in Tanzania for sightings of the powerful eland, the world’s largest antelope. The equally impressive greater kudu and sable antelope haunt the miombo-covered foothills of the mountains that rise from the park’s borders.

More than 400 bird species have been recorded, with such colourful common residents as the lilac-breasted roller, yellow-throated long claw and bateleur eagle joined by a host of European migrants during the rainy season. Hippos are the star attraction of the pair of pools situated 5km north of the main entrance gate, supported by an ever-changing cast of water-birds.

About Mikumi National Park
Size: 3,230 sq km (1,250 sq miles), the fourth-largest national park in Tanzania, and part of a much larger ecosystem centred on the uniquely vast Selous Game Reserve.
Location: 283 km (175 miles) west of Dar es Salaam, north of Selous, and en route to Ruaha, Udzungwa and (for the intrepid) Katavi. .

How to get there
A good surfaced road connects Mikumi to Dar es Salaam via Morogoro, a roughly 4 hour drive.
Also road connections to Udzungwa, Ruaha and (dry season only) Selous.
Charter flight from Dar es Salaam, Arusha or Selous. Local buses run from Dar to park HQ where game drives can be arranged.

What to do
Game drives and guided walks. Visit nearby Udzungwa or travel on to Selous or Ruaha.

Accommodation
Two lodges, three luxury tented camps, three campsites.
Guest houses in Mikumi town on the park border. One lodge is proposed at Mahondo and one permanent tented camp at Lumaaga

Maura HomeStay

Maura HomeStay

Maura HomeStay

Maura HomeStay modest rooms in a down-to-earth B&B featuring a cozy lounge & organized excursions.

For travelers who want to take in the sights and sounds of Arusha, The guest house is the perfect choice. Situated 2km from Arusha clock Tower city center, guests are able to reach the town’s attractions and activities. Maura Homestay is accommodation that allows guests to rent a room or entire family house and experience the genuine local lifestyle in Arusha, Tanzania.

Here, guests stay in a home in a very informal setting and more family-orientated environment. Facilities also cater for students, backpackers, and leisure travelers who want to experience travel instead of rushing to the next destination. Maura Homestay is your complete one-stop destination for quality hotel accommodations in Arusha, Tanzania.

What You Get
At a glance:

Lovely home, close to public transport. Has a BBQ area, three bedrooms and fully equipped kitchen.

Uniqueness:

Short and Long Term Stays.

Privacy:

Renting a home or an apartment means freedom from having to deal with hotel staff—or anyone else, for that matter.

Comfort:

Vacation rentals offer many of the conveniences you’re used to at home, including more space to spread out.

A kitchen:

You don’t have to use it, but it’s nice to have if you want to save some money and be able to invite new friends over for your famous paella.

Value:

Vacation rentals can offer great value for the money. For instance, you can usually find one that will accommodate a large group for much less than a hotel.

We offer 24/7 support and that means ease and convenience for you. Even if a booking request comes through at the last minute, we will be here to help.

Safari Styles Experiences

Safari Styles Experiences

When thinking about African safari holidays, you probably think about seeing plenty of wildlife in big reserves from a 4×4 vehicle, luckily there is many options of safari styles experiences to chose from.

But a safari can be so much more and organising a good safari can be daunting.

There are so many safari styles experiences and destinations to choose from.
That is why Nature Bound Africa exists.
We will help you put together the ultimate safari experience all according to your needs and desires.
Once you’ve made your choice, we will make sure everything is booked and organised exactly as you want it.
As you will see when you scroll down this page, we have something to choose from for everyone and even interesting specials.

FAMILY SAFARI

Safari Styles & Experiences

F L Y – I N S A F A R I

Safari Styles Experiences flying safari

W E L L N E S S S A F A R I

wellness natureboundafrica

We are delighted to offer bespoke safari options for those who wish to create their own golf and safari holiday.

golf wellness natureboundafrica

A variety of optional supplements are available, all of which can be added on to any golf safari. These include:

  • Helicopter flights

  • Horse riding

  • Polo lessons

  • Golf lessons

  • Cultural tours

  • Community tours

  • Private conservancy tours (to the Maasai Steppe Conservancy)

  • Spa treatments

  • A visit to the Shanga workshop