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African Safari Adventure on Any Budget

African Safari Adventure on Any Budget

Rwanda Uganda Gorilla Tracking Tours Gorilla Watching Congo African Safari Adventure on Any Budget

There is no denying that African Safari Adventure can be a very expensive travel destination.
There are many amazing luxury and comfort tours that can give you an unforgettable, high-class experience. However, you may not know that there are also budget-friendly trips targeted at young travellers looking for an African Safari Adventure on Any Budget.
Sure, your money doesn’t stretch as far as it would in South-East Asia or South America, but it’s worth it for the trip of a lifetime–which you’ll realize the first time you see a majestic elephant from as close as 15 feet away. So, my advice for young, budget travellers is to see Africa by going on an overland trip or joining a group for camping safari adventure.
This involves travelling in a large overlanding truck and staying in national parks through participation camping, which requires putting up your own tent and helping out with food preparation using the truck’s mobile kitchen.
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Gombe Stream National Park

Gombe Stream National Park is the smallest of Tanzania’s national parks: a fragile strip of chimpanzee habitat straddling the steep slopes and river valleys that them in the sandy northern shore of Lake Tanganyika. Its chimpanzees, habituated to human visitors, were made famous by the pioneering work of Jane Goodall, who in 1960 founded a behavioral research program that now stands as the longest-running study of its kind in the world.

Size : 52 sq km (20 sq miles).

Location: 16 km (10 miles) north of Kigoma on the shore of Lake Tanganyika in western Tanzania.

Chimpanzees share about 98% of their genes with humans, and no scientific expertise is required to distinguish between the individual repertoires of pants, hoots and screams that define the celebrities, the powerbrokers, and the supporting characters. Perhaps you will see a flicker of understanding when you look into a chimp’s eyes, assessing you in return – a look of apparent recognition across the narrowest of species barriers.

The most visible of Gombe’s other mammals are also primates. A troop of beachcomber olive baboons, under study since the 1960s, is exceptionally habituated, while red-tailed and red colobus monkeys – the latter regularly hunted by chimps – stick to the forest canopy.

The park’s 200-odd bird species range from the iconic fish eagle to the jewel-like Peter’s twinspots that hop tamely around the visitors’ centre.

After dusk, a dazzling night sky is complemented by the lanterns of hundreds of small wooden boats, bobbing on the lake like a sprawling city.

Top 10 Things to do in Tanzania

Top 10 Things to do in Tanzania

Tanzania contains a beautiful microcosm of African life, a thriving and flourishing nation that serves up the greatest adventure dishes in the world.

African safaris are the main attraction but once you have had enough game time, the tours certainly aren’t over there. With an abundance of exotic beaches, stunning colonial towns and prodigious mountains to trek, Tanzania offers an eclectic array of wonderful holiday activities.
This definitive list is set up to give you an insight into the top 10 things to do in Tanzania

10. Pemba

Still Somewhat undiscovered, Pemba provides an off-the-beaten-track island destination for tourists. With few beaches and a hilly terrain, this island is the perfect spot to release your inner explorer.

Pemba offers an alternative to the usual idyllic island life. Photo by LC Seiler
Pemba is still relatively untouched compared to its neighbor, Zanzibar, however this considerably hilly island has some very unique attraction. Perfect for the explore, Pemba has lush vegetation and monumental hillside cliffs that overhang beautiful coves and bays.
There are some idyllic offshore islets that offer a chance to gain a fantastic diving experience and the few beach stretches that there are, are well worth a visit.
Also popular in Pemba is its voodoo presence and traditional healing processes, a feature that attracts people from all over Africa.
Get lost by yourself and experience the true charms of visiting a more untouched island.

9. Arusha National Park

Although relatively small, this national park comprises excellent landscapes with varied and spectacular views. amazing backdrops and eclectic wildlife, Arusha National Park shouldn’t be missed.

Zebra spotting isn’t a hard task in the Arusha National Park. Photo by Kyle Taylor.
In addition to Arusha National Park providing great wildlife and game viewing, it is covers Mt.Meru, Africa’s 5th highest mountain peak that offers scintillating views of its nearby cousin, Mt Kilimanjaro.
On your ascent up Mt.Meru observe and study the rich wealth of flowers and shrubbery along with the frequent encounters with beautiful rare animals.

8. Gombe National Park

A beautiful facade of bamboo and rain forest, Gombe National Park, although Tanzania’s smallest, is famous for the behavioral study of chimpanzees.

Visit the tremendous chimpanzees in Gombe National Park. Photo by Afrika Force.
Its diverse inhabitants and wildlife, including chimps, baboons, red-tailed monkeys, snakes, bush pigs, hundreds of rare birds make Gombe National Park an increasingly popular attraction. Be sure to keep your eye open for the occasional sighting of hippos and leopards too.
Visitors can trek through the dense rain forest and head towards the lake to see even more rare animals by snorkeling with the beautiful aquatic life of the park.

7. Tarangire National Park

With a huge number of elephants and a great display of wildlife, it is no wonder Tarangire National Park draws in so many visitors.

Elephants can’t help but look adorable. Photo by Lindsay Maizland.
The residents of Tarangire National Park are all so venerated in the safari realm that it makes this park simply unmissable. From the tree climbing lions to the gargantuan elephants, Tarangire tours are a dream for animal lovers. Bird enthusiasts should also make the trip considering the rich array of colorful bird life within the park.

6. Lake Manyara National Park

Offering a microcosm of the African safari experience, Lake Manyara National Park contains a densely populated animal life amongst the scenic beauty of the lake and the landscape.

A diverse selection of wild animals intermingle by the lakeside of Manyara. Photo by Prasad Pillai.
Experience the authentic African experience as crowds of animals gather around the oasis of Lake Manyara, the vast lake in the Manyara park where beautiful rare animals coexist relish in the parks surroundings.
See the pink facade of flamingos as they seek refuge in the inviting lake and then head off to the canopy trail to view the extensive amount of lush jungle, dominant rain forest trees and frenetic tree-top life.

5. Zanzibar Town

A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Zanzibar Town is simply the perfect island getaway, boasting charming colonial streets and luxurious golden beaches. Tanzania tours just got better!

Zanzibar Town is romantic and stunning, with incredible beaches. Photo by Kyle Taylor.
Zanzibar Town epitomizes the contradictions in Africa. Whilst most people are out in the arid grasslands searching for the big 5, a trip to Zanzibar Town will reawaken your romantic instincts and make you walk the dreamy streets endlessly before hitting the glorious beaches for a spot of sun and a refreshing snorkel.
A truly charming colonial town, Zanzibar is top priority on a lot of peoples  Tanzania list.

4. Mahale Mountains National Park

With access to a nearby beach and lush green forestry, this (predominantly) chimpanzee park offers a true Tanzanian adventure.

Warthogs are among just some of the amazing animals on view. Photo by Nils Rinaldi
Mahale Mountains National Park is a beautiful park with varying landscapes, features and wild animals. Although set-up to preserve the incredible chimpanzees, it also draws in bird lovers, beach goers, forest trekkers and genuine  park lovers.
The chain of picturesque mountains and the therapeutic lake make for a romantic sunset stroll.

3. Ngorongoro Crater

Ngorongoro Crater is widely considered as one of the most special African experiences. Saturated with fascinating wild animals and a truly unique landscape, the crater offers wonderful safari tours.

The Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, is a truly remarkable experience. Photo by Nat Friedman
 Ngorongoro Crater‘s untainted scenery and wealth of wildlife contains arguably the best safari tour in Africa. With amazing animals ranging from Rhinos, elephants, lions and buffaloes plus many, many more, along with being introduced to local Masai Mara tribesmen, this scintillating tour is one reason why Tanzania is an African gem.

2. Mt. Kilimanjaro

People dream of reaching the peak of Africa. Tanzania tours with trip.me allow you to reach that goal and hike one of the most beautiful and challenging mountains in the world.

Climbing Mt Kilimanjaro offers rewarding views. Photo by Demetrius John Kessy
Mt Kilimanjaro has been challenging and rewarding people for hundreds of years. The unrivaled views and the vast beauty don’t just arrive at the peak, the whole ascent and descent are filled with perfect scenery, ranging from lush vegetation to shimmering glaciers.

1. Serengeti National Park

The Creme de la creme of African safaris, the Serengeti National Park is Africa’s largest and most famous safari park and a chance to get up close and personal with some of the worlds greatest animals.

A tour of the Serengeti will introduce to some amazing animals. Photo by William Warby.
The annual wildebeest migration is just one thing that attracts millions of visitors year round to the Serengeti National Park. Tours of this park off vital opportunities to observe the top 5 in their natural habitat and gaze at an endless spectacular spectacle.
Linked to the Masai Mara of Kenya, you must allocate a lot of time to experience and appreciate all that this vast safari park has to offer.
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Tanzania can be hard to get around, in which case I love using this triposo travel app, the perfect tool for not missing a beat when I’m traveling – “delivering up-to-date information, detailed maps and intelligent recommendations.”
That was a lot to take in, and there are even more great sights that Tanzania has to offer. Write in the comments section below your great experiences of Tanzania and the sights that you think should make the top 10…
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No cancellation fees for Ebola

No cancellation fees for Ebola

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa has been in the news a lot lately and has understandably caused some concern among travellers who are considering or have booked a trip to Africa. We want to first of all put your mind at ease. As we explained in our previous blogs, the media has greatly hyped up people’s fears and exaggerated the risk of Ebola. We put things in perspective in these blog posts, and below you will find another short summary regarding why it is completely safe to travel to Tanzania or Kenya  and even book a trip for any time in the future without any worries about Ebola.

We are so confident that there will be no Ebola outbreak in Tanzania or Kenya that we are prepared to amend our standard terms and conditions to offer a guaranteed 100% refund to all clients who have booked with us in advance, and end up having to cancel or postpone in the unlikely event that the Ebola outbreak spreads to Tanzania or Kenya .

This amended cancellation policy will apply to any new or existing bookings if the sole reason for cancellation or postponement is an Ebola outbreak, which we define as follows:

An Ebola outbreak must be called and confirmed by the WHO. It is not one or two isolated, imported cases of Ebola from people arriving from affected areas, and merely being treated or quarantined locally. An Ebola outbreak is when there are multiple (two or more) confirmed cases of NEW INFECTIONS that have occurred WITHIN Tanzania or Kenya  (or any adjacent destination on your itinerary booked through us), excluding direct family members or health care workers who have had direct contact with isolated Ebola victims, where the spread of the virus remains contained within the treatment facility and does not affect the general public.

(It is important to stress that many countries including the US have already had one or two isolated cases of imported Ebola victims being treated, and in some cases infection has spread to direct family members or health care workers who have had careless, close personal contact with the victim. In none of these cases has this resulted in an Ebola outbreak amongst the general public. In the recent American case, all 48 people who had contact with the victim were monitored and NONE of them contracted Ebola, apart from the original nurses who treated him before they realised he had Ebola. Again, this puts the risk in perspective.)

Should an Ebola outbreak occur in Tanzania or Kenya  as per above definition, you are entitled to cancel or postpone your trip at no charge, subject to the following conditions:

  1.  That there is a genuine and confirmed Ebola outbreak in Tanzania or Kenya or other adjacent destination on your itinerary as booked with Nature Bound Africa .
  2.  That a trip postponement is subject to availability for the new travel dates. Your trip can be postponed without penalty for up to 1 year from original date of travel.
  3.  That you have paid by credit card (this is advisable since most credit cards automatically also include basic travel insurance) since we will simply reverse the transaction on your credit card to process the refund. This avoids unnecessary foreign currency conversion fees and bank charges associated with refunds by bank transfer. If you have paid by bank transfer, we can still refund you but your refund amount will be subject to deduction of the applicable bank charges and foreign currency conversion fees.
  4.  All clients are required to take out comprehensive travel insurance, and should first claim from their travel insurance in case of an Ebola outbreak. This protects us in the highly unlikely event of an Ebola outbreak, because some third party suppliers may not have the same generous cancellation policy in place and will charge us cancellation fees. We will then refund whatever amount is not covered by your travel insurance.
  5.  That you understand a change in dates may result in a minor change in rates if third party rates have been increased, and fall in a new season or new year. Our own rates will not be affected (for up to 12 months) but third party suppliers such as accommodation providers may implement annual increases or seasonal (high and low season) rates that may affect your amended travel dates. Flight costs may also be subject to change.
  6.  Flights can only be covered by this agreement if you allow us to book refundable or amendable flight tickets for you. With most airlines, their cheapest ticket class is not refundable and allows no changes, so if we are asked to book any of your flights and you insist that we book you on the cheapest available flights, the cost of flights will be excluded from this refund offer. Our advice is that you book your own flights online and book the slightly more expensive airfares or ticket option, with more flexible booking terms and a full refund policy in place. Most airfares (even low cost airlines) also allow a cancellation insurance option at a small extra cost. If we book your flights and you opt not to take the cancellation insurance or more flexible ticket option, your flights will not be covered by this agreement.
  7.  This applies only to cancellations or postponements due to a confirmed Ebola outbreak in your travel destination as booked by Nature Bound Africa . For all other cancellations or postponements, our regular terms and conditions and standard cancellation policy will apply.

We hope this offer of a 100% refund will set your mind at ease, that you are not taking a financial risk by booking a trip to Africa during this time.

Why are you so confident? Isn’t Ebola very serious?

Yes and no. It is serious in three, small, West African countries called Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea. In the rest of Africa, the risk of Ebola is not serious at all. Here is a summary of some points that will explain why we are so confident. If you have not read our previous blog posts or still have doubts about travelling to Tanzania or Kenya , these points will hopefully help to put things in perspective and ease any concerns you may have regarding Ebola:

  • Ebola is not airborne and does not spread very easily. The only people who get infected are those with direct contact with Ebola victims or bodies, such as direct family members or health care workers. You won’t get Ebola from someone on a plane – if someone has contagious Ebola they won’t even be on a plane. And simply being close to someone with Ebola will not spread the virus.
  • Tanzania or Kenya has been denying entry to all visitors from the three affected nations in West Africa, and actively screens all incoming passengers at all airports. The same is true for Uganda and Rwanda. This means it is highly unlikely that we will see Ebola cases entering East Africa.
  • At the time of writing, in over 10 months since the start of the outbreak (the first 5-6 months with no screening measures in place) absolutely no cases of Ebola have occurred in Tanzania or Kenya (nor anywhere else in Southern or East Africa). This shows how low the risk is and how exaggerated the media-generated fears have been.
  • Those countries that have had isolated cases of Ebola (usually imported cases of health workers returning from West Africa) have all successfully contained the virus and it is has not led to an outbreak of Ebola in any of these countries, including third world countries like Nigeria and Senegal, which are now completely Ebola free after successfully containing their few isolated cases.
  • In the first 10 months since the outbreak, 4500 deaths and 9000 cases of Ebola have been reported, almost exclusively in West Africa. This sounds like a lot, but during this same time, up to 40,000 Americans are estimated to have died from the common flu, and up to 500,000 people are estimated to have died from malaria worldwide. This is not to trivialise the deaths due to Ebola but puts the crisis and figures in perspective. Ebola remains a tiny, insignificant blib on the list of the world’s most serious diseases to worry about.
  • Geographically, cities like Miami, London, Paris, Lisbon, and many other European and American destinations are situated much closer to the center of the Ebola outbreak than Tanzania, Kenya or South Africa . Africa is not one country but a huge continent and the distances are massive. Nairobi, Kenya has one of the most modern airports in East Africa, with excellent screening and quarantine facilities. You will be thousands of miles from the nearest Ebola case, and there is no more risk of being infected with Ebola by travelling to East Africa as there is from travelling to Europe or the US.
  • With the world’s airports and health care systems on high alert now, the chances that this Ebola outbreak will spread to other countries (beyond isolated, imported cases as we have already seen in many countries and have all been contained) is virtually zero. Ebola is nothing new, it has been with us for many years and we have seen many previous outbreaks. It is much less serious than the bird flu epidemic we saw a few years ago, simply because it is not airborne, not very contagious and easy to prevent infection with even the most basic precautions.

Where is Ebola?

ebola map No cancellation fees for Ebola

May we also point out that most of the  Nature Bound Africa’s team happen to live in Tanzania or Kenya  with our families and we can honestly say that we have zero fear of contracting Ebola. Not because we are ignorant, but because we are informed. To date, EVERY SINGLE Ebola-related travel postponement or trip cancellation has been entirely pointless and an unfortunate waste, not just for us and the local tourism industry in terms of lost revenue, but for the travellers concerned, who have missed out on a fantastic trip, and may end up spending more money later on to do a similar trip (for example, the Shilling-USD exchange rate is very favourable for foreign tourists at the moment – Tanzania or Kenya  currently offers the best value for money that it has in many years).

In closing, our advice regarding Ebola is well-researched and based on WHO fact sheets, not media hype. We’ve had endorsements from healthcare experts with experience in infectious diseases and public health care in the UK as well as in Tanzania and Kenya . Don’t believe the media hype, and don’t let the fear of Ebola spoil your African adventure.

We look forward to welcoming you to safe, sunny, Ebola-free Tanzania or Kenya  for the safari of a lifetime!

Spotlight On: Tarangire National Park

Tarangire National Park, traversed by its lifeblood – the Tarangire River, is one of the treasures of Tanzania’s northern safari circuit.

Eleph Tarangire river 1024x682 Spotlight On: Tarangire National Park

During the dry season thousands of animals migrate into the park as the retreating river continues to provide one of the few drinkable water sources for local wildlife.

The park’s striking landscapes are full of diversity, and unique to Tarangire. The gently undulating hills are dotted with vast numbers of surreal looking Baobab trees, patches of thick bush, and tall grasses, which seem to shimmer when the sunlight hits their tips.

Bird-watchers will be absolutely delighted by a visit to Tarangire. The swamps, tinged green year round, are the focus for 550 bird varieties, the most breeding species in one habitat anywhere in the world. Even in the dry season, you can expect to see dozens of unique East African birds.

Disused termite mounds are often frequented by colonies of the endearing dwarf mongoose, and pairs of red-and-yellow barbet, which draw attention to themselves by their loud, rhythmic, duets.

Tarangire’s pythons climb trees, as do its lions and leopards, lounging in the branches where the fruit of the sausage tree disguises the twitch of a tail.

10374352 582955231819766 1224965471 n Spotlight On: Tarangire National Park
Tarangire features the greatest concentration of wildlife outside the Serengeti ecosystem, and the start attractions are the elephants, huge mobs of which are easily encountered, wet or dry season.

African elephants are the largest land animals on Earth. You’ll see a lot of ear flapping going on, and one of the main reasons for this is to assist with heat loss. An elephant’s trunk is actually a long nose used for smelling, breathing, trumpeting, drinking, and also for grabbing things—especially a potential meal. The trunk alone contains about 100,000 different muscles.

African elephant societies are arranged around family units. Each family unit is made up of around ten closely related females and their calves and is led by an older female.

Tarangire’s elephants love water! They enjoy showering by sucking water into their trunks and spraying it all over themselves. Afterwards, they often take a dust bath, covering their skin with a protective coating, which explains the dried mud that is often caked onto their skins.

Elephants eat roots, grasses, fruit, and bark, and they eat a lot of these things. An adult elephant can consume up to 136 kilograms (300 pounds) of food in a single day. This is hardly surprising given that a male elephant can weigh more than 6,000 kg (13,340 lb).

Both male and female African elephants have tusks they use to dig for food and water and strip bark from trees. Males use the tusks to battle one another, but the ivory has also attracted violence of a far more dangerous sort.

Because ivory is so valuable to some humans, many elephants have been killed for their tusks. This trade is illegal today, but it has not been completely eliminated, and some African elephant populations remain endangered.

slide7581 Spotlight On: Tarangire National Park

Elephant slaughter in Tanzania declined sharply after 1987 when the government launched a major anti-poaching operation. But the poaching has revived in recent years, driven by fast-rising demand for ivory in Asia. Organised and intricate poaching networks in and outside of Tanzania sustain this illegal trade, making it difficult for Tanzania alone to win this battle. Much of it takes place in the reserves of Southern Tanzania, where there has been a massive decline in elephant numbers over the last ten years. The elephants of Tarangire, while still under constant threat of slaughter, have not been affected as greatly as their cousins in the South.

As the premier safari destination, new strategies are being developed to stem elephant poaching in Tanzania. Some estimates suggest that if these efforts are not successful, the population of elephants in Tanzania could be wiped out within 10 years.

Wildlife hunting is big business – a recent 2013 estimate valued the illegal poaching trade in Africa as being worth $17 billion dollars a year and growing.

Poverty is the primary driver of poaching in Africa. But increasingly, poaching is being carried out by heavily armed criminals who operate like gangs. Crime networks in both Africa and China are behind much of the poaching activity.

In China such a tusk sells for more than $2000, its value increasing tenfold by the time it is shipped out of Africa and arrives in Asia. There is also a market for illegal ivory in Thailand, Vietnam, and the Philippines, where it is carved into religious items, such as rosaries and crucifixes. Some researchers estimate that as much as 90 percent of the ivory for sale in Asia is illegal.

slide31 Spotlight On: Tarangire National Park

Tanzania’s elephants draw tourists from around the world, providing a legal, sustainable source of income for people living in communities where elephants range. Tourism not only provides an important source of alternative income to local people, it also demonstrates the international value attached to elephants and other wildlife, and ensures that someone is always keeping an eye on what is going on. And the money the government earns from tourism fees and taxes helps fund anti-poaching operations. So your visit to Tanzania will have many benefits beyond great experiences, lasting memories, and stunning photos.

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