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Solo travel made safe

Solo travel made safe

image Solo travel made safe

Independent travel is a liberating experience – but it can be daunting, too. Observing a few common-sense rules of the road can keep you safe on your journey

Is 2015 the year you want to head out on the open road alone? Even if you’re looking forward to the total freedom of travelling solo, there are sure to be some doubts as you face what could be a daunting prospect. Employ a spot of Fixology, though, and you can enjoy the freedom and flexibility of travelling solo, safely.

Consider your destination

There are some geopolitical hotspots, such as various destinations in the Middle East, that are currently best avoided. Be aware of any issues by checking the Foreign Office website. Beyond this, there are some countries that are easier to travel around alone; most European destinations present few issues, for example. Longer haul, consider places that travellers tend to congregate, such as Thailand, where infrastructure is good and you might meet others in the same situation. Australia and New Zealand are even easier, with no language barrier and excellent infrastructure.

Join a group

One halfway house for nervous first-timers is to join a guided group trip for “solo” travellers. Yes, you do lose a bit of your independence, but you gain the necessary backup to build confidence for your next truly solo trip. It need not be the old cliched Club 18-30 holiday (which are actually often a lot of fun for those in that age group), with a wide choice of operators today targeting different ages and tastes.

Keep your belongings safe

Minimise the potential stress of losing your passport or cash hoard and having to sort it out alone by keeping your luggage and key belongings safe. Buy a subtle travel pouch or belt to keep things tucked away out of sight and plan to carry a minimum of cash by packing bank cards and credit cards instead – but keep them separate so they can’t be lost all at once. Use a tagging service such as idtagit to ensure that if you do lose something, anyone who finds it will know how to return it.

Take care

When you are out on the road alone, use traveller common sense. Blend in by wearing what the locals do: avoid wearing your favourite sports top or any clothing that may offend local customs, such as sleeveless tops or short skirts. Be wary and remember that you don’t have the benefit of safety in numbers, so keep your belongings close and avoid attracting attention, especially at potential flashpoints like bars, clubs and transport hubs.

Keep in touch

Checking in with others is a great way to stay safe when travelling solo. Let your social media friends know how often you will be updating your status so they can keep an eye on you. It’s safer to bore them with daily photos of the Taj Mahal than disappear off the radar. Use social media, email, texts, calls and any other communications you can to let people you trust know where you will be and when, so they can watch out for you and alert someone if they are concerned.

Travelling Alone: The pros & Cons

 
 

Travelling Alone: The pros & Cons

Travelling Alone Travelling Alone: The pros & Cons

For some, the idea of setting off with nothing but a backpack for company is utterly terrifying. For others, it is the best and only way to travel.

We take a look at some of the pros and cons of travelling solo.

Pros

  • Self indulgence
    The major bonus of travelling on your own is having the freedom to do whatever you want, whenever you want to do it. With nobody else around, you can plan your itinerary to suit your own particular travelling style.
  • Flexibility
    Travelling alone allows you to adapt and change your plans at short notice without debate or compromise.
  • New friends
    Solo travellers tend to be more approachable than groups. You’ll be able to mingle with other backpackers, and make lots of new friends en route.
  • No arguments
    No matter how much you like your friends, spending 24 hours a day with one person can become tiresome. If you do plan on travelling with someone, it’s perhaps best to test the waters first with a short trip, so you can familiarise yourself with their habits and moodswings.
  • Less hassle
    Groups of travellers will always attract more attention than a lone traveller, particularly from locals touting for business.
  • Learning about yourself
    When travelling alone, you’ll have more time to really reflect and learn about yourself.

Cons

  • Loneliness
    No matter how independent you are, solo travellers will always suffer the occasional bout of loneliness. You can however combat this by heading to traveller spots to meet other single explorers.
  • Security
    Travelling in a pair or a group can feel much safer than being alone. You can look out for each other and watch over each other’s belongings. If you are travelling solo, there are some precautions you can take, for example, don’t arrive at your destination during the night.
  • Expensive
    Travelling alone tends to be more expensive. Hostels typically charge by the room, not by the number of people staying in them. People travelling in groups can split the cost of food and other expenses.
  • Boring pictures
    If you’re travelling alone, you’ll probably end up with lots of ‘MySpace’ style pictures, because you’ll have no one to snap your pic at all the wonderful places you visit.
  • No safety net
    If you travel alone, you’ll be completely responsible for your own actions. There will be nobody there to look after you, or to tell you when you’re too drunk, or when you’ve spent too much money.

How to cope with jetlag

How to cope with jetlag

jet lag How to cope with jetlag

Jetlag can ruin the start of your adventure in a new country. There’s no cure for it but there are ways of dealing with it.

You touch down on the next leg of your Holiday Safari Adventure Experience in Africa, but the quick change of time zones means you’re feeling fatigued, tired, can’t sleep at night and suffering from headaches.
This is known as jetlag and without taking the right precautions, it could really put a downer on the first few days of your trip.
Why do we get jetlag?
Our internal body clock controls when we feel sleepy and when we feel active. It’s controlled by daylight so we get used to a regular rhythm of daylight and darkness. But when you’re travelling the world, and through different time zones, your body clock will be out of sync with local time when you reach your destination.
The bad news is there’s no cure for jetlag. Within two to six days, usually, you’ll start to feel better. But if you’ve travelled a long distance to your next destination, it can take up to 14. But the good news is there are ways to cope with jetlag that lowers the impact.
Adjust your body clock
Before you leave for your next travel destination, try shifting your internal clock. It may be hard when there are a million things to do in such little time, but try getting up and going to bed slightly earlier if you’re flying east, for example, to Australia or getting up and going to bed later if you’re flying west, for example, to America.
If you’re flying in the evening, don’t sleep too much, so you’ll be naturally tired when you arrive. But if your flight arrives in the morning, sleep as much as possible during the flight so you can stay awake through the day. The minute you touch down on the next leg of your travels, get into the local routine immediately. Try to fight through and spend the day outdoors. Natural light can also help your body clock adjust.
While there are no medicines available for jetlag, medical research suggests that the hormone melatonin can be useful to people who are travelling across time zones. Speak to your NBA for more information.
Five tips for coping with jetlag
  • Walk around during your flight to exercise 
  • Eat in-flight meals to mirror the time at your destination 
  • Drink plenty of water – at least one glass every hour will keep you regularly hydrated
  • Eat carbohydrates and greens before your flight to help build up your body’s defences 
  • Don’t drink alcohol and coffee before or during your flight – this causes dehydration which contributes to jetlag

Incredible Archaeological Sites in Africa

Incredible Archaeological Sites in Africa

Africa’s archaeological sites helped explain some of the greatest mysteries in history of mankind but there are also many that baffle modern scientists. This is because these early societies weren’t supposed to be as advanced. Here is a list of 10 incredible archaeological sites in Africa.

Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania

Olduvai Gorge is one of the most important archaeological sites on earth, let alone Africa. This is owing to the fact that it showcases the progress of human evolution. The fossils found here date back to more than 1.9 million years ago and include evidence of man as a scavenger, hunter and social being. Various types of tools have been discovered as well.

Valley of the Kings, Egypt

From the mid to the late 2nd millennium BC, Egyptian pharaohs and some members of nobility were buried in tombs constructed in the Valley of the Kings. The area has been receiving visitors since antiquity which is evident from Greek and Latin inscriptions on the walls. Unfortunately, not all visitors were tourists and over the centuries most of the 63 tombs in the area have been robbed.

Gedi Ruins, Kenya

Gedi was a city along the Kenyan coast that flourished from the 13th to the beginning of the 17th century. In the 1940s, the archaeologists excavating on the site uncovered some very interesting artifacts. These include items originating from far overseas including Spain, Venice, India and China. The city had an impressive palace, a large mosque and exquisite stone houses.

Laetoli, Tanzania

In 1976, the renowned British paleo-anthropologist Mary Leakey discovered footprints of a hominid in Laetoli. Footprints in volcanic ash revealed that this early man walked in an upright manner. Other footprints were found as well, including from hyenas, rhinos, birds, baboons and even gazelles. The scientific community was astounded since the Laetoli discovery proved that early man was walking upright approximately 3.6 million years ago.

Sterkfontein Caves, South Africa

The Sterkfontein Caves are often referred to as the Cradle of Humankind as there is no other place on earth with a larger number of hominid fossils. To date (paleo-anthropologists have been excavating on the site since the mid-1930s), remains of about 500 hominids have been found with ‘Mrs. Ples’ and ‘Little Foot’ being the most prominent. While ‘Mrs. Ples’ is the most complete skull of Australopithecus ever found, ‘Little Foot’ is one of the most complete early hominid skeletons in the world.

Blombos Cave, South Africa

The Blombos Cave has helped answer many questions about Homo sapiens that occupied the area some 100,000 years ago. The mystery of cultural origin and behavioral patterns of early man is slowly being uncovered here. According to many paleo-anthropologists, modern human behavior can be traced back to this group of Homo sapiens that was shown to be very innovative, well organized and creative. The site was discovered in 1991.

Meroe, Sudan

Meroe was one of the wealthiest cities of the ancient Kingdom of Kush. Established in 800 BC, the city was influenced greatly by the neighboring Egyptian civilization. But in the 3rd century BC, the Egyptian art, language and writing began to disappear. In the 3rd and 4th century AD, Meroe started to decline, mainly due to the collapse of external trade. Nevertheless, the remains of this ancient city which include over 200 pyramids still stand as evidence of its former splendor.

Nok, Nigeria

Nok is a village and an archaeological site in Nigeria which is famous worldwide for its terracotta figurines. The site has been dated to the mid-4 millennium BC (disputed by some) and gave name to the so-called Nok culture. This ancient civilization emerged in Nigeria in the 11th century BC and collapsed around 300 AD for unknown reasons. Archaeological finds reveal that the Nok culture was highly advanced even though West African societies supposed to be primitive at that time.

Koobi Fora, Kenya

The area around Koobi Fora is renowned for sandstones and siltstones containing well preserved remains of hominins and terrestrial mammals dating back as far as 4.2 million years ago. Hominin fossils that have been discovered in Koobi Fora include: Australopithecus anamensis, Australopithecus boisei, Homo habilis, Homo rudolfensis and Homo ergaster. Also found were many stone tools most of which, however, aren’t associated with hominins.

Laas Gaal, Somalia

Laas Gaal is a complex of rockhouses and caves containing rock art dating back to 9,000 BC. The rock paintings shows people worshiping cows with large horns and ceremonial robes. Locals knew about the rockhouses and caves for hundreds of years before a team of French researches discovered the site in 2002. Like many other archaeological sites in Somalia, Laas Gaal hasn’t been fully explored yet.

 

East Africa Safaris in style, Adventures with a difference

East Africa Safaris in style, Adventures with a difference

tanzania mt kilimanjaro summit sign 93 East Africa Safaris in style, Adventures with a difference

How about skyping live in the African Savannah. Imagine sharing with those you love the wildbeest migration or lion hunt as it happens. When you think of WIFI what comes to mind. Large cities, modern hotels, hotel lobbies in the city, airport lounge, coffee café and so on. It’s all about modern. In this world today almost everything if not all has gone online. Internet is everything. You can find almost all you need on the internet.This is what successful business is all about.

view East Africa Safaris in style, Adventures with a difference

When most Business or corporate executives or families come to Africa they only expect to find internet in the hotels that they will stay in. In this age almost but not all have internet. This shuts down a person’s world until you finish your days on Tanzania & Kenya safari. Unless for those who really want to shut down from the world and enjoy their time in Africa, we have an option.

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With this in mind, making WIFI available even while on the safari was born. An idea that has been well accepted by our clients. Skype while on safari is phenomenal with the clients . Pass every detail of the safari and business schedules to friends and families back home. If you are accompanied by family on your trip, we handle it too. IPods and puzzles are provided for children to keep them engaged. They cover the distances without their knowledge. These are comfortable Business and leisure travel safaris with an exceptional experience. While at it, Gather your points and Save for the the next coming trips . A free lunch, dinner or night will be free for you. Travel in Africa and do it in style.

Untitled2 East Africa Safaris in style, Adventures with a difference

East Africa is a destination with something for everyone:  ‘Safari’ is a Swahili word meaning ‘journey’

simba East Africa Safaris in style, Adventures with a difference

With lions, elephants, giraffes, zebras and more roaming the diverse and dramatic landscape, stunning white sand beaches overlooking the Indian Ocean, and fascinating cultures from the Maasai people to Arab traders, East Africa is one of the most amazing destinations in the world. Nature Bound Africa will help you discover the richness of East Africa and have the adventure of your life. We will take care of your safety and comfort, while ensuring you get the most out of your African experience.

zebras2 East Africa Safaris in style, Adventures with a difference

We specialise in arranging environmentally sensitive safaris within the East African countries of Tanzania, Kenya, Rwanda and Uganda. You can choose from one of our tried and tested safari packages, or you can build your own. Just tell us where you’d like to go, what you’d like to do, and how much time you’ve got, and we will put something together to suit your needs and budget.

NBA2 East Africa Safaris in style, Adventures with a difference

Serengeti and Maasai Mara National Parks are undoubtedly the most famous of East Africa’s protected areas, with the annual wildebeest migration attracting thousands of visitors each year. Visiting the highly endangered mountain gorillas, made famous by Dian Fossey and captured in the movie Gorillas in the Mist, is a definite highlight.

Kili2BSummit East Africa Safaris in style, Adventures with a difference

For a real African adventure, try hiking in and around the Ngorongoro Crater, Tarangire and Lake Manyara National Parks also reward travellers with their abundant wildlife. And once you’ve worn yourself and your camera out, head to one of the stunning coastal locations like Zanzibar or southern Kenya. Travel with us and get a true local perspective on these amazing places.

Defying Gravity, Water flows uphill in Kenya
maxresdefault East Africa Safaris in style, Adventures with a difference

Water defying gravity – going up-hill

It comprises of different ecosystems, unique and diverse cultures, breathtaking landscapes, the seventh wonder of the world –wildebeests migration, ever smiling and welcoming people bird life and wildlife exposed by the renowned wildlife documentaries.

Experiencing the sights, sounds, smell and first impressions of all above is quite simply beyond expectations. Most people come to see the big five but there is a lot more that has not been exposed and eye catching at that. Some of the experiences are mind blowing. They will be beyond your wildest expectations.

view East Africa Safaris in style, Adventures with a difference

Ever seen where water flows uphill? Guess your answer is no but there is a place in Eastern Kenya where you experience just that. No geologists yet have given a satisfactory explanation for the hills defiance of gravity and may be this should be another wonder of the world. The hill is located in Machakos, 60 kilometers east of Nairobi at a local area known as Kyamwilu.

lions on tree2 East Africa Safaris in style, Adventures with a difference

Some youth keep vigil around the hill so that there can demonstrate the “magic” to you, but its real and not a trick being played on you. With a bottle of water at hand they will pour it o the ground and everyone expects it to flow down hill. But at this magic hill the water flows up hill. Another test is to park you car at the bottom of the hill and engage free gear. The vehicle goes uphill gathering speed as it climbs up to about halfway. The car tends to climb faster if moving backward. Amazing it is. The amazing hill has become an attraction to many. It is a phenomenon that defies gravity.

This is just but one of the few attractions that are just explainable. While on Safari , inquire about this not just the animals and your Kenya safari may be beyond your imagination. info@natureboundafrica.com

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