Committed to creating unique, African safari travel experiences. We go where YOU want, and depart when YOU want.

African Safari

Solo travel made safe

Solo travel made safe

image Solo travel made safe

Independent travel is a liberating experience – but it can be daunting, too. Observing a few common-sense rules of the road can keep you safe on your journey

Is 2015 the year you want to head out on the open road alone? Even if you’re looking forward to the total freedom of travelling solo, there are sure to be some doubts as you face what could be a daunting prospect. Employ a spot of Fixology, though, and you can enjoy the freedom and flexibility of travelling solo, safely.

Consider your destination

There are some geopolitical hotspots, such as various destinations in the Middle East, that are currently best avoided. Be aware of any issues by checking the Foreign Office website. Beyond this, there are some countries that are easier to travel around alone; most European destinations present few issues, for example. Longer haul, consider places that travellers tend to congregate, such as Thailand, where infrastructure is good and you might meet others in the same situation. Australia and New Zealand are even easier, with no language barrier and excellent infrastructure.

Join a group

One halfway house for nervous first-timers is to join a guided group trip for “solo” travellers. Yes, you do lose a bit of your independence, but you gain the necessary backup to build confidence for your next truly solo trip. It need not be the old cliched Club 18-30 holiday (which are actually often a lot of fun for those in that age group), with a wide choice of operators today targeting different ages and tastes.

Keep your belongings safe

Minimise the potential stress of losing your passport or cash hoard and having to sort it out alone by keeping your luggage and key belongings safe. Buy a subtle travel pouch or belt to keep things tucked away out of sight and plan to carry a minimum of cash by packing bank cards and credit cards instead – but keep them separate so they can’t be lost all at once. Use a tagging service such as idtagit to ensure that if you do lose something, anyone who finds it will know how to return it.

Take care

When you are out on the road alone, use traveller common sense. Blend in by wearing what the locals do: avoid wearing your favourite sports top or any clothing that may offend local customs, such as sleeveless tops or short skirts. Be wary and remember that you don’t have the benefit of safety in numbers, so keep your belongings close and avoid attracting attention, especially at potential flashpoints like bars, clubs and transport hubs.

Keep in touch

Checking in with others is a great way to stay safe when travelling solo. Let your social media friends know how often you will be updating your status so they can keep an eye on you. It’s safer to bore them with daily photos of the Taj Mahal than disappear off the radar. Use social media, email, texts, calls and any other communications you can to let people you trust know where you will be and when, so they can watch out for you and alert someone if they are concerned.

The world famous Maasai Mara

The world famous Maasai Mara

wildebeest migrations The world famous Maasai Mara

Maasai Mara

The world famous Maasai Mara is home to the Great Migration, July through October each year. It also boasts astonishing amount of resident wildlife. The rolling grasslands, the Mara River and the Rift Valley all make for great game viewing and wildlife photography.

Amboseli

To capture the definitive Kenyan wildlife shot, visit Amboseli and photograph herds of elephant wandering past the foot of Mount Kilimanjaro. Amboseli’s big skies and far horizons, combined with swampy springs and dry and dusty earth trampled by hundreds of animals, is a safari paradise – and the views of Mount Kilimanjaro are incomparable.

Tsavo

The twin National Parks of Tsavo East and West form one of Africa’s largest wilderness reserves, incorporating savannah, ranges and hills, acacia and montane forest, and an extensive river system. Tsavo is a bird watcher’s paradise, and viewing hippo and crocodile in the crystal clear waters of the volcanic Mzima springs is unique in all of East Africa.

Mount Kenya

Africa’s second highest mountain, Mount Kenya, is both a Unesco World Heritage site and a Unesco Biosphere Reserve. The mountain is best seen at dawn, when the day’s early light silhouettes its impressive summit high over the surrounding mountains. Trekking on Mount Kenya, for all levels of walkers, is a true African wilderness adventure. Meru Made famous by conservationists George and Joy Adamson, Meru is where Elsa the lioness was raised. With impressive views of Mount Kenya, visitors to this lovely wilderness may see eland, Bohor reedbuck, black rhino and some of the more than 427-recorded bird species in the park’s diverse habitats.

Samburu

Samburu is the best place to find several endemic Northern species, including gerenuk, the reticulated giraffe and Grevy’s zebra. Lions are frequently seen on the riverbanks, and cheetah can be found on the open plains together with huge herds of elephant. Travellers will also delight in meeting the Samburu people, who call this wild part of Kenya home.

Laikipia

This spectacular region is the gateway to Kenya’s northern frontier country. Wild and sparsely populated, much of Laikipia is covered by privately owned ranches where cattle share the land with free-ranging wildlife. Horseback riding through Laikipia’s wilderness is a true African adventure.

Lake Naivasha

This fresh water lake, fringed by thick papyrus, is home to an incredible variety of birds, including the pink-backed pelican, goliath heron and giant kingfisher. The waters of the lake draw a great range of game: giraffe feed on the acacia, buffalo wallow in the shallow waters and colobus monkeys call from the treetops.

Lamu

End your Kenyan safari by spending a few days in the ancient town of Lamu on the Indian Ocean coast. The winding streets, traditional houses and carved woods hark back to the Swahili culture of old.

Travelling Alone: The pros & Cons

 
 

Travelling Alone: The pros & Cons

Travelling Alone Travelling Alone: The pros & Cons

For some, the idea of setting off with nothing but a backpack for company is utterly terrifying. For others, it is the best and only way to travel.

We take a look at some of the pros and cons of travelling solo.

Pros

  • Self indulgence
    The major bonus of travelling on your own is having the freedom to do whatever you want, whenever you want to do it. With nobody else around, you can plan your itinerary to suit your own particular travelling style.
  • Flexibility
    Travelling alone allows you to adapt and change your plans at short notice without debate or compromise.
  • New friends
    Solo travellers tend to be more approachable than groups. You’ll be able to mingle with other backpackers, and make lots of new friends en route.
  • No arguments
    No matter how much you like your friends, spending 24 hours a day with one person can become tiresome. If you do plan on travelling with someone, it’s perhaps best to test the waters first with a short trip, so you can familiarise yourself with their habits and moodswings.
  • Less hassle
    Groups of travellers will always attract more attention than a lone traveller, particularly from locals touting for business.
  • Learning about yourself
    When travelling alone, you’ll have more time to really reflect and learn about yourself.

Cons

  • Loneliness
    No matter how independent you are, solo travellers will always suffer the occasional bout of loneliness. You can however combat this by heading to traveller spots to meet other single explorers.
  • Security
    Travelling in a pair or a group can feel much safer than being alone. You can look out for each other and watch over each other’s belongings. If you are travelling solo, there are some precautions you can take, for example, don’t arrive at your destination during the night.
  • Expensive
    Travelling alone tends to be more expensive. Hostels typically charge by the room, not by the number of people staying in them. People travelling in groups can split the cost of food and other expenses.
  • Boring pictures
    If you’re travelling alone, you’ll probably end up with lots of ‘MySpace’ style pictures, because you’ll have no one to snap your pic at all the wonderful places you visit.
  • No safety net
    If you travel alone, you’ll be completely responsible for your own actions. There will be nobody there to look after you, or to tell you when you’re too drunk, or when you’ve spent too much money.
Positive SSL Wildcard
error: Alert: Content is protected !!