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African Destinations To Visit

African Destinations To Visit

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Africa is blessed with amazing natural treasures and we hope you’ll find these destinations and events interesting and tempting to explore.

1. Bwindi Impenetrable National Park (Uganda).

The park is part of the Bwindi Impenetrable Forest and is situated along the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) border next to the Virunga National Park. The park provides habitat for 120 species of mammals, 348 species of birds, 220 species of butterflies, 27 species of frogs, chameleons, geckos, and many endangered species.

2. Mosi-oa-Tunya/Victoria Falls (Zambia and Zimbabwe).

One of the biggest tourist attractions in Africa, Victoria Falls is undoubtedly amongst the most spectacular waterfalls in the world. Located on the mighty Zambezi River, Victoria Falls is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and it is one of the largest waterfalls in the world.

3. Wildebeest migration (Kenya and Tanzania).

Certainly a must see, the migration is considered one of nature’s great spectacles and sees over a million wildebeest trek north from the Serengeti (Tanzania) to the Maasai Mara (Kenya). The wildebeests are joined on this epic journey by thousands of eland, gazelle and zebra as they cross the crocodile-infested Mara River to graze on the Maasai Mara plains.

4. Bazaruto Archipelago (Mozambique)

Is a group of six islands. Bazaruto Island is the largest in the Bazaruto Archipelago and Bazaruto National Park. The archipelago is certainly a beautiful destination which needs to be explored. The archipelago  boasts of by a wide array of marine and wildlife, azure waters and amazing beaches.

5. Ennedi Massif (Chad).
Ennedi Massif: Natural and Cultural Landscape, which was recently named one of UNESCO’s Newest World Heritage Sites. This sandstone landscape is one of the world’s finest examples of rock art and carvings. Ennedi Massif has been sculpted by water and wind erosion over time into a plateau featuring canyons and valleys that present a spectacular landscape marked by cliffs, natural arches and pitons. The site is indeed a cultural treasure.
6. Sanganeb Marine National Park and Dungonab Bay

Mukkawar Island Marine National Park (Sudan) recently inscribed as one of UNESCO’s Newest World Heritage Sites. Sanganeb is a coral atoll 25km off the coast of Sudan. Sanganeb National Park is indeed a marvel. Dungonab Bay is another remarkable marine treasure, which provides a habitat for large populations of seabirds, marine mammals, fish, sharks, and turtles.

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7. National Arts Festival (South Africa)

One of the most important events on the South African cultural calendar, and undoubtedly one of the biggest arts events on the African continent. Starting at the end of June/beginning of July, it runs for between 8 and 10 days and is held in the small university city of Grahamstown. The programme comprises drama, dance, physical theatre, comedy, opera, music, jazz, visual art exhibitions, film, student theatre, street theatre, lectures, craft fair, workshops, and a children’s arts festival.

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8. Erin Ijesha Waterfalls(Nigeria)

is also known as Olumirin waterfalls. A visit to Nigeria is not complete for a tourist without a visit to Erin-Ijesa because it’s the popular and most visited tourist attraction in Nigeria. Olumirin is a seven step waterfall and each step of the waterfall has a flowing fountain that marks the mystical nature of the place. The waterfall is a stunning assemblage of seven unique levels, with each level providing a whole new outlook when compared to the previous level. The water fall exudes a therapeutic ambience which only something natural can produce.

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Exploring Zanzibar Tropical Island Adventure

Exploring Zanzibar Tropical Island Adventure

sauti za busara 1 Exploring Zanzibar Tropical Island Adventure

Zanzibar wraps its reality around you like a lingering fairytale. This tiny archipelago of Indian Ocean islands that once lured sailors, Sultans and slavers to its far-distant shores is so charismatic that it sweeps you into its shadowy romantic past and sunlit present all at once, and finally sets you down, all sun-bronzed and laden with spices and island art, and memories of an exceptionally sparkling and colourfully abundant sea.
Zanzibar pic1 Exploring Zanzibar Tropical Island Adventure
The main island is small and easy to explore, with glorious white sand, palm-fringed beaches rewarding you for just a couple of hours’ drive to the North coast and the same to the East, along mainly hopeless but endlessly fascinating roads flanked by simple homesteads, roads worn more by foot or bicycle and frequented by chickens.
 
There is a time warp here, this place where the past is so responsible for the present, where mobile phones, internet connections and television are all relatively recent, and where the history and culture is so imbued that you can simply stretch out beneath the dappled shade of the coconut palms and soak it up. Welcome to Zanzibar, and a world apart.
Zanzibar pic2 Exploring Zanzibar Tropical Island Adventure

Sailors and traders from the first century AD came to the lands of ‘Zinj el Barr’, the Black Coast, bringing beads, porcelain and silks to trade for gold, slaves and spices, ebony, ivory, indigo and tortoiseshell. They waited for annual monsoon winds to fill their dhow sails and bear them across the Indian Ocean; today’s visitors usually arrive in a small ‘plane or ferry from Dar es Salaam.

But these still afford a measured approach, allowing a breathtaking vision of sparkling cerulean waters over sandbanks and reefs, and then into Stone Town, the ancient island capital, still more of a town than a city, a maze of winding pedestrian streets in a hotchpotch of rooftops, a mass of corrugated iron overwhelming the historic stonework beneath.

Helplessly entwined in its own history, the people of Zanzibar are the Swahili, evolving from the influx of mainly Arabian and Persian immigrants who settled on the East African coast and islands to trade and escape the political upheavals of the Gulf two thousand years ago. Their cultural history was founded in sailing dhows, similar to those that glide by its shores today, boats that brought people, language and cultures and long centuries of power wrangling.

Zanzibar pic3 Exploring Zanzibar Tropical Island Adventure
The Arab immigrants were overthrown by the Portuguese in the 15th century, until the Sultan of Oman finally saw them off for good in 1698 and started building the Stone Town of today; the Old Fort on the harbour was built on the remains of a Portuguese church dating back to 1600.
 
Visitors to Stone Town still encounter the grandiose vision and dominant architectural style of a confident young Sultan who transferred the seat of his sultanate from the contentious capital of Muscat to the breezier climes of Zanzibar in 1832, and then began palace building in earnest, and seeding the coconut palms and clove plantations which soon defined Zanzibar as the ‘Spice Island’.
Zanzibar pic4 Exploring Zanzibar Tropical Island Adventure

Driving through the island centre now, it is worth stopping to explore the spice plantations, where a guided walk for passing tourists is likely to be more lucrative than vast crops to export, but it is a fine sensual pleasure to crumble cinnamon bark straight from the tree, to breathe the scent of cloves drying in the sun, to taste and guess the spice from a handful of pods and powders.

These are well used by the chefs and kitchens in beach hotels, where fishermen daily bring the catch of the day to be grilled, baked, battered or blanched with assorted Zanzibar spice.The coast is dotted with hotels, self-contained beach hideaways that relish their privacy and provide various levels of style and comfort.

I have been to most and head north by choice, to the northernmost peninsula which is occupied by Ras Nungwi Beach Hotel. The name is a very literal Swahili translation, but it says nothing of how this beach is secluded and the coral sands are blanched very, very pale. It does not tell how the wonderfully translucent and clear the sea is here, where a coral reef surrounds the shore creating a shallow wide expanse to explore until the tide rises high and then turquoise waves crash onto the beach. It is a naturally beautiful place.

Zanzibar pic5 Exploring Zanzibar Tropical Island Adventure
Turtles come ashore to lay their eggs when the moon is full, and the surrounding reefs are a thriving colourful world to snorkel and dive. Ras Nungwi Beach Hotel is essentially respectful of its place, each room constructed from local wood and coral rag to create a number of thatched round houses along the beach, with lodge rooms in gardens behind.
 
Soft sand pathways link the central thatched and open-sided restaurant to the rooms, pool and dive centre, providing the comforts of a fine hotel with a rustic, beach hideaway style. This is a fine place to lie back and soak up Zanzibar, crack open a coconut, watch the dhows on the far horizon and look forward to spice-scented, star filled African night.

Lake Chala a crater in the shadow of Kilimanjaro

Lake Chala a crater in the shadow of Kilimanjaro

Lake Chala Lake Chala a crater in the shadow of Kilimanjaro

Lake Chala a crater in the shadow of Kilimanjaro is a unique caldera lake, and is thought to be the deepest inland body of water in Africa. This lake is fed by underground springs from Mount Kilimanjaro.

The lake has a great diversity of life. From lush lake shore forest to stunning volcanic savannah; from river beds marvelously carved through ancient rock, to thick bush or open ‘mbuga’. Walking at Lake Chala is a magical experience that will put you back in touch with nature.

The lake is fed by groundwater flows, which come from Mount Kilimanjaro, fed and drained underground with a rate of about 10 million m³ / year. Depending on the time of year, it ranges in colour from deep blue to turquoise and green, it is surrounded by a 100 metres high crater rim.

Chala has a huge variety of amazing trees, grasses and plants; some are unique to the area. According to the time of year there are hundreds of species of butterflies and birds, including spectacular birds of prey. The African Fish Eagle, with its haunting techniques, Verreaux’s Eagle, Augur Buzzards and many other species of birds can be seen around the crater walls. Wild mammals do vary including Blue Monkeys, Colobus Monkeys, baboons, dik-dik, kudu and elephant. Chala is an untouched part of a truly ancient land and a must visit place.

Activities at this lake: walking safaris, canoeing, swimming and fishing.

In the early 1900’s crocodiles were introduced to the lake. However, over the years local fishermen have killed them and it is highly likely that none exist there today.

Local fishermen can be seen in their dugouts drifting silently along, they come to fish there almost daily.

Lake Chala Boat Lake Chala a crater in the shadow of Kilimanjaro

Myths and legends surround the lake and the local people believe a whole Maasai village disappeared into the lake. It is said that the spirits of those people still haunt the lake today…

Lake Chala and the surrounding area is spectacularly interesting, not just because of Kilimanjaro that can be seen on clear days towering in the background but also because it thrives with life. Walking around you can spot plenty of birds (about 200 species) and small mammals such as blue monkeys, colobus monkeys, baboons, dik-dik and kudu. Being so close to Tsavo National Park you might be able to see large herds of elephants that migrate back and forth between Kenya and Tanzania.

Probably a must-do when at Lake Chala is to go on a walk down the steep crater walls to the water. The walk is very scenic with great views of the lake and vegetation. Swimming is possible but it is advised to stay close to the shore. 
Another interesting walk is the river bed tour. There is a seasonal river nearby where the water has eroded the walls into beautiful shapes.

1 1 1 Lake Chala a crater in the shadow of Kilimanjaro

This is also a good place to spot baboons and other wildlife.

Accommodation is possible at Lake Chala Safari Camp. There are luxury tents and well-equipped campsites with hot water ablutions. Visit Lake Chala on a day trip or stay overnight to experience the tranquility of the lake and wake up by birdsong. A visit to Lake Chala makes an excellent day trip.

Malindi Kenya Little Italy

Malindi Kenya Little Italy

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Malindi Kenya Little Italy

Malindi is a small town located in coastal Kenya. It acquired the name ‘Little Italy’ because of the growing Italian population in the area, which is more than 3,000 at present. It is also estimated that Italians own more than 2,500 properties there.

Three decades ago, the scene was not the same. The first batch of Italian tourists flew into the scenic coastal town in 1978 to enjoy the beautiful white sand beaches. The number of flights has been increasing ever since.

Smooth cultural integration between the locals and tourists has been a major factor facilitating the transaction. Locals in Malindi have grown fond of the Italians to an extent that their relationship crosses commercial boundaries.

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Malindi Kenya

You’ll definitely be forgiven for mistaking that you’re in Rome when in Malindi. The billboards are filled with Italian advertisements. Interestingly, locals from all walks of life in the quiet town are eloquent in the language as well.

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Malindi. The billboards

East Africa Safaris in style, Adventures with a difference

East Africa Safaris in style, Adventures with a difference

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How about skyping live in the African Savannah. Imagine sharing with those you love the wildbeest migration or lion hunt as it happens. When you think of WIFI what comes to mind. Large cities, modern hotels, hotel lobbies in the city, airport lounge, coffee café and so on. It’s all about modern. In this world today almost everything if not all has gone online. Internet is everything. You can find almost all you need on the internet.This is what successful business is all about.

view East Africa Safaris in style, Adventures with a difference

When most Business or corporate executives or families come to Africa they only expect to find internet in the hotels that they will stay in. In this age almost but not all have internet. This shuts down a person’s world until you finish your days on Tanzania & Kenya safari. Unless for those who really want to shut down from the world and enjoy their time in Africa, we have an option.

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With this in mind, making WIFI available even while on the safari was born. An idea that has been well accepted by our clients. Skype while on safari is phenomenal with the clients . Pass every detail of the safari and business schedules to friends and families back home. If you are accompanied by family on your trip, we handle it too. IPods and puzzles are provided for children to keep them engaged. They cover the distances without their knowledge. These are comfortable Business and leisure travel safaris with an exceptional experience. While at it, Gather your points and Save for the the next coming trips . A free lunch, dinner or night will be free for you. Travel in Africa and do it in style.

Untitled2 East Africa Safaris in style, Adventures with a difference

East Africa is a destination with something for everyone:  ‘Safari’ is a Swahili word meaning ‘journey’

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With lions, elephants, giraffes, zebras and more roaming the diverse and dramatic landscape, stunning white sand beaches overlooking the Indian Ocean, and fascinating cultures from the Maasai people to Arab traders, East Africa is one of the most amazing destinations in the world. Nature Bound Africa will help you discover the richness of East Africa and have the adventure of your life. We will take care of your safety and comfort, while ensuring you get the most out of your African experience.

zebras2 East Africa Safaris in style, Adventures with a difference

We specialise in arranging environmentally sensitive safaris within the East African countries of Tanzania, Kenya, Rwanda and Uganda. You can choose from one of our tried and tested safari packages, or you can build your own. Just tell us where you’d like to go, what you’d like to do, and how much time you’ve got, and we will put something together to suit your needs and budget.

NBA2 East Africa Safaris in style, Adventures with a difference

Serengeti and Maasai Mara National Parks are undoubtedly the most famous of East Africa’s protected areas, with the annual wildebeest migration attracting thousands of visitors each year. Visiting the highly endangered mountain gorillas, made famous by Dian Fossey and captured in the movie Gorillas in the Mist, is a definite highlight.

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For a real African adventure, try hiking in and around the Ngorongoro Crater, Tarangire and Lake Manyara National Parks also reward travellers with their abundant wildlife. And once you’ve worn yourself and your camera out, head to one of the stunning coastal locations like Zanzibar or southern Kenya. Travel with us and get a true local perspective on these amazing places.

Defying Gravity, Water flows uphill in Kenya
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Water defying gravity – going up-hill

It comprises of different ecosystems, unique and diverse cultures, breathtaking landscapes, the seventh wonder of the world –wildebeests migration, ever smiling and welcoming people bird life and wildlife exposed by the renowned wildlife documentaries.

Experiencing the sights, sounds, smell and first impressions of all above is quite simply beyond expectations. Most people come to see the big five but there is a lot more that has not been exposed and eye catching at that. Some of the experiences are mind blowing. They will be beyond your wildest expectations.

view East Africa Safaris in style, Adventures with a difference

Ever seen where water flows uphill? Guess your answer is no but there is a place in Eastern Kenya where you experience just that. No geologists yet have given a satisfactory explanation for the hills defiance of gravity and may be this should be another wonder of the world. The hill is located in Machakos, 60 kilometers east of Nairobi at a local area known as Kyamwilu.

lions on tree2 East Africa Safaris in style, Adventures with a difference

Some youth keep vigil around the hill so that there can demonstrate the “magic” to you, but its real and not a trick being played on you. With a bottle of water at hand they will pour it o the ground and everyone expects it to flow down hill. But at this magic hill the water flows up hill. Another test is to park you car at the bottom of the hill and engage free gear. The vehicle goes uphill gathering speed as it climbs up to about halfway. The car tends to climb faster if moving backward. Amazing it is. The amazing hill has become an attraction to many. It is a phenomenon that defies gravity.

This is just but one of the few attractions that are just explainable. While on Safari , inquire about this not just the animals and your Kenya safari may be beyond your imagination. info@natureboundafrica.com

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