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Solo travel made safe

Solo travel made safe

image Solo travel made safe

Independent travel is a liberating experience – but it can be daunting, too. Observing a few common-sense rules of the road can keep you safe on your journey

Is 2015 the year you want to head out on the open road alone? Even if you’re looking forward to the total freedom of travelling solo, there are sure to be some doubts as you face what could be a daunting prospect. Employ a spot of Fixology, though, and you can enjoy the freedom and flexibility of travelling solo, safely.

Consider your destination

There are some geopolitical hotspots, such as various destinations in the Middle East, that are currently best avoided. Be aware of any issues by checking the Foreign Office website. Beyond this, there are some countries that are easier to travel around alone; most European destinations present few issues, for example. Longer haul, consider places that travellers tend to congregate, such as Thailand, where infrastructure is good and you might meet others in the same situation. Australia and New Zealand are even easier, with no language barrier and excellent infrastructure.

Join a group

One halfway house for nervous first-timers is to join a guided group trip for “solo” travellers. Yes, you do lose a bit of your independence, but you gain the necessary backup to build confidence for your next truly solo trip. It need not be the old cliched Club 18-30 holiday (which are actually often a lot of fun for those in that age group), with a wide choice of operators today targeting different ages and tastes.

Keep your belongings safe

Minimise the potential stress of losing your passport or cash hoard and having to sort it out alone by keeping your luggage and key belongings safe. Buy a subtle travel pouch or belt to keep things tucked away out of sight and plan to carry a minimum of cash by packing bank cards and credit cards instead – but keep them separate so they can’t be lost all at once. Use a tagging service such as idtagit to ensure that if you do lose something, anyone who finds it will know how to return it.

Take care

When you are out on the road alone, use traveller common sense. Blend in by wearing what the locals do: avoid wearing your favourite sports top or any clothing that may offend local customs, such as sleeveless tops or short skirts. Be wary and remember that you don’t have the benefit of safety in numbers, so keep your belongings close and avoid attracting attention, especially at potential flashpoints like bars, clubs and transport hubs.

Keep in touch

Checking in with others is a great way to stay safe when travelling solo. Let your social media friends know how often you will be updating your status so they can keep an eye on you. It’s safer to bore them with daily photos of the Taj Mahal than disappear off the radar. Use social media, email, texts, calls and any other communications you can to let people you trust know where you will be and when, so they can watch out for you and alert someone if they are concerned.

A JOURNEY BACK IN TIME WITH ONE OF THE WORLD’S OLDEST TRIBE

A JOURNEY BACK IN TIME WITH ONE OF THE WORLD’S OLDEST TRIBE
bushmen experience A JOURNEY BACK IN TIME WITH ONE OF THE WORLD’S OLDEST TRIBE
The Hadzabe tribe of Tanzania is the last true nomads of Africa

They grow no food, raise no livestock, and live without rules or calendars. They are living a hunter-gatherer existence that is little changed from 10,000 years ago. What do they know that we’ve forgotten?

Spending time with traditional hunter-gatherers
Spending time with traditional hunter-gatherers could be likened to spending time with yourself – with the clock wound back several thousand years. It brings to the fore everything we find alluring and appealing about spending time in the bush – the wild animals, the scenery and the savage beauty – but in this case we form a part of that environment as one of the apex predators.
Lake Eyasi

Living near Lake Eyasi in northern Tanzania, the Hadza have managed to preserve their hunter-gatherer way of life for over 30 000 – maybe over 50 000 – years. Their language was once classified with the Khoisan due to similar click sounds, but it has since been reclassified as an isolate – a language unrelated to any other.

They are also not closely genetically related to any other tribe. This, combined with their location in the Great Rift Valley, only adds to the intrigue and mystique of these wonderful people. Even their oral history, unlike that of most African tribes, does not indicate that they moved to Hadzaland from elsewhere, making them one of the oldest tribes in Africa – if not the oldest.

Using bow and arrow

Using bow and arrow, Hadza hunters shoot tiny birds from 30 yards with deadly precision. A hunter takes aim at a bird and follows through the thorns to find his quarry. Below: Hunters kindle a fire to cook birds and a freshly killed dik-dik. 

Hadza typically live in camps with 20-40 residents. On any given day, camp members decide where and how to forage by closely observing their country, discussing their observations with other camp members, and by drawing upon their expert knowledge of the land. Though the Hadza recognize five general regions within their country (Mangola, Han!abi, Tli’ika, Sipunga, and Dunduiya), there are no land-holding territorial divisions between Hadza groups.

The Hadza

The Hadza are highly skilled, selective, and opportunistic foragers, and adjust their diet according to season and circumstance. Depending on local availability, some groups might rely more heavily on tubers, others on berries, others on meat. This variability is the result of their opportunism and adjustment to prevailing conditions.

Traditionally, the Hadza do not make use of hunting dogs, although this custom has been recently borrowed from neighboring tribes to some degree. Most men (80%+) do not use dogs when foraging.

 

The they’ve never lived densely enough to be seriously threatened by an infectious outbreak. They have no known history of famine; rather, there is evidence of people from a farming group coming to live with them during a time of crop failure.

The Hadza diet remains even today more stable and varied than that of most of the world’s citizens. They enjoy an extraordinary amount of leisure time. Anthropologists have estimated that they “work”—actively pursue food—four to six hours a day. And over all these thousands of years, they’ve left hardly more than a footprint on the land.

Travelling Alone: The pros & Cons

 
 

Travelling Alone: The pros & Cons

Travelling Alone Travelling Alone: The pros & Cons

For some, the idea of setting off with nothing but a backpack for company is utterly terrifying. For others, it is the best and only way to travel.

We take a look at some of the pros and cons of travelling solo.

Pros

  • Self indulgence
    The major bonus of travelling on your own is having the freedom to do whatever you want, whenever you want to do it. With nobody else around, you can plan your itinerary to suit your own particular travelling style.
  • Flexibility
    Travelling alone allows you to adapt and change your plans at short notice without debate or compromise.
  • New friends
    Solo travellers tend to be more approachable than groups. You’ll be able to mingle with other backpackers, and make lots of new friends en route.
  • No arguments
    No matter how much you like your friends, spending 24 hours a day with one person can become tiresome. If you do plan on travelling with someone, it’s perhaps best to test the waters first with a short trip, so you can familiarise yourself with their habits and moodswings.
  • Less hassle
    Groups of travellers will always attract more attention than a lone traveller, particularly from locals touting for business.
  • Learning about yourself
    When travelling alone, you’ll have more time to really reflect and learn about yourself.

Cons

  • Loneliness
    No matter how independent you are, solo travellers will always suffer the occasional bout of loneliness. You can however combat this by heading to traveller spots to meet other single explorers.
  • Security
    Travelling in a pair or a group can feel much safer than being alone. You can look out for each other and watch over each other’s belongings. If you are travelling solo, there are some precautions you can take, for example, don’t arrive at your destination during the night.
  • Expensive
    Travelling alone tends to be more expensive. Hostels typically charge by the room, not by the number of people staying in them. People travelling in groups can split the cost of food and other expenses.
  • Boring pictures
    If you’re travelling alone, you’ll probably end up with lots of ‘MySpace’ style pictures, because you’ll have no one to snap your pic at all the wonderful places you visit.
  • No safety net
    If you travel alone, you’ll be completely responsible for your own actions. There will be nobody there to look after you, or to tell you when you’re too drunk, or when you’ve spent too much money.

How to cope with jetlag

How to cope with jetlag

jet lag How to cope with jetlag

Jetlag can ruin the start of your adventure in a new country. There’s no cure for it but there are ways of dealing with it.

You touch down on the next leg of your Holiday Safari Adventure Experience in Africa, but the quick change of time zones means you’re feeling fatigued, tired, can’t sleep at night and suffering from headaches.
This is known as jetlag and without taking the right precautions, it could really put a downer on the first few days of your trip.
Why do we get jetlag?
Our internal body clock controls when we feel sleepy and when we feel active. It’s controlled by daylight so we get used to a regular rhythm of daylight and darkness. But when you’re travelling the world, and through different time zones, your body clock will be out of sync with local time when you reach your destination.
The bad news is there’s no cure for jetlag. Within two to six days, usually, you’ll start to feel better. But if you’ve travelled a long distance to your next destination, it can take up to 14. But the good news is there are ways to cope with jetlag that lowers the impact.
Adjust your body clock
Before you leave for your next travel destination, try shifting your internal clock. It may be hard when there are a million things to do in such little time, but try getting up and going to bed slightly earlier if you’re flying east, for example, to Australia or getting up and going to bed later if you’re flying west, for example, to America.
If you’re flying in the evening, don’t sleep too much, so you’ll be naturally tired when you arrive. But if your flight arrives in the morning, sleep as much as possible during the flight so you can stay awake through the day. The minute you touch down on the next leg of your travels, get into the local routine immediately. Try to fight through and spend the day outdoors. Natural light can also help your body clock adjust.
While there are no medicines available for jetlag, medical research suggests that the hormone melatonin can be useful to people who are travelling across time zones. Speak to your NBA for more information.
Five tips for coping with jetlag
  • Walk around during your flight to exercise 
  • Eat in-flight meals to mirror the time at your destination 
  • Drink plenty of water – at least one glass every hour will keep you regularly hydrated
  • Eat carbohydrates and greens before your flight to help build up your body’s defences 
  • Don’t drink alcohol and coffee before or during your flight – this causes dehydration which contributes to jetlag

Affordable Guilt Free East African Getaways

Affordable Guilt Free East African Getaways
Samburu2BGame2BViewing Affordable Guilt Free East African Getaways
 
Nature Bound Africa blasts the myth that an East Africa vacation is only for the rich with our Guilt-Free Getaways, a collection of short getaways to East Africa that start as low as $2,500 per person.
 
“We focus on making safaris affordable,” “By putting our buying power to work, we’re able to design safaris that don’t skimp on amenities but are extremely affordable. The collection features something for everyone. Honeymooners can venture to the idyllic Indian Ocean island of Mombasa and history buffs will enjoy our Glimpses of Tanzania journey which includes a 6-night Game drive.
 
One of the most popular tours is our 9-Day Highlights of Kenya which features Mt. Kenya, Lake Nakuru and the Masai Mara — starting at $2,595 per person. There are currently six Guilt-Free Getaways all starting at less than $3,000 per person.
 
Nature Bound Africa experienced Tour Consultants work with travelers from start to finish, creating a personalized vacation within their budget. NBA’s flexibility not only gives travelers the option to mix and match different hotels to splurge in some places and “conserve” in others, but in most cases, tours can be designed to depart on almost any day of the week. And because Nature Bound Africa arranges tours throughout East Africa, travelers can arrange a full East African experience with just one phone call.
 
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