Committed to creating unique, African safari travel experiences. We go where YOU want, and depart when YOU want.

Kenya

The world famous Maasai Mara

The world famous Maasai Mara

wildebeest migrations The world famous Maasai Mara

Maasai Mara

The world famous Maasai Mara is home to the Great Migration, July through October each year. It also boasts astonishing amount of resident wildlife. The rolling grasslands, the Mara River and the Rift Valley all make for great game viewing and wildlife photography.

Amboseli

To capture the definitive Kenyan wildlife shot, visit Amboseli and photograph herds of elephant wandering past the foot of Mount Kilimanjaro. Amboseli’s big skies and far horizons, combined with swampy springs and dry and dusty earth trampled by hundreds of animals, is a safari paradise – and the views of Mount Kilimanjaro are incomparable.

Tsavo

The twin National Parks of Tsavo East and West form one of Africa’s largest wilderness reserves, incorporating savannah, ranges and hills, acacia and montane forest, and an extensive river system. Tsavo is a bird watcher’s paradise, and viewing hippo and crocodile in the crystal clear waters of the volcanic Mzima springs is unique in all of East Africa.

Mount Kenya

Africa’s second highest mountain, Mount Kenya, is both a Unesco World Heritage site and a Unesco Biosphere Reserve. The mountain is best seen at dawn, when the day’s early light silhouettes its impressive summit high over the surrounding mountains. Trekking on Mount Kenya, for all levels of walkers, is a true African wilderness adventure. Meru Made famous by conservationists George and Joy Adamson, Meru is where Elsa the lioness was raised. With impressive views of Mount Kenya, visitors to this lovely wilderness may see eland, Bohor reedbuck, black rhino and some of the more than 427-recorded bird species in the park’s diverse habitats.

Samburu

Samburu is the best place to find several endemic Northern species, including gerenuk, the reticulated giraffe and Grevy’s zebra. Lions are frequently seen on the riverbanks, and cheetah can be found on the open plains together with huge herds of elephant. Travellers will also delight in meeting the Samburu people, who call this wild part of Kenya home.

Laikipia

This spectacular region is the gateway to Kenya’s northern frontier country. Wild and sparsely populated, much of Laikipia is covered by privately owned ranches where cattle share the land with free-ranging wildlife. Horseback riding through Laikipia’s wilderness is a true African adventure.

Lake Naivasha

This fresh water lake, fringed by thick papyrus, is home to an incredible variety of birds, including the pink-backed pelican, goliath heron and giant kingfisher. The waters of the lake draw a great range of game: giraffe feed on the acacia, buffalo wallow in the shallow waters and colobus monkeys call from the treetops.

Lamu

End your Kenyan safari by spending a few days in the ancient town of Lamu on the Indian Ocean coast. The winding streets, traditional houses and carved woods hark back to the Swahili culture of old.

Travelling Alone: The pros & Cons

 
 

Travelling Alone: The pros & Cons

Travelling Alone Travelling Alone: The pros & Cons

For some, the idea of setting off with nothing but a backpack for company is utterly terrifying. For others, it is the best and only way to travel.

We take a look at some of the pros and cons of travelling solo.

Pros

  • Self indulgence
    The major bonus of travelling on your own is having the freedom to do whatever you want, whenever you want to do it. With nobody else around, you can plan your itinerary to suit your own particular travelling style.
  • Flexibility
    Travelling alone allows you to adapt and change your plans at short notice without debate or compromise.
  • New friends
    Solo travellers tend to be more approachable than groups. You’ll be able to mingle with other backpackers, and make lots of new friends en route.
  • No arguments
    No matter how much you like your friends, spending 24 hours a day with one person can become tiresome. If you do plan on travelling with someone, it’s perhaps best to test the waters first with a short trip, so you can familiarise yourself with their habits and moodswings.
  • Less hassle
    Groups of travellers will always attract more attention than a lone traveller, particularly from locals touting for business.
  • Learning about yourself
    When travelling alone, you’ll have more time to really reflect and learn about yourself.

Cons

  • Loneliness
    No matter how independent you are, solo travellers will always suffer the occasional bout of loneliness. You can however combat this by heading to traveller spots to meet other single explorers.
  • Security
    Travelling in a pair or a group can feel much safer than being alone. You can look out for each other and watch over each other’s belongings. If you are travelling solo, there are some precautions you can take, for example, don’t arrive at your destination during the night.
  • Expensive
    Travelling alone tends to be more expensive. Hostels typically charge by the room, not by the number of people staying in them. People travelling in groups can split the cost of food and other expenses.
  • Boring pictures
    If you’re travelling alone, you’ll probably end up with lots of ‘MySpace’ style pictures, because you’ll have no one to snap your pic at all the wonderful places you visit.
  • No safety net
    If you travel alone, you’ll be completely responsible for your own actions. There will be nobody there to look after you, or to tell you when you’re too drunk, or when you’ve spent too much money.

How to cope with jetlag

How to cope with jetlag

jet lag How to cope with jetlag

Jetlag can ruin the start of your adventure in a new country. There’s no cure for it but there are ways of dealing with it.

You touch down on the next leg of your Holiday Safari Adventure Experience in Africa, but the quick change of time zones means you’re feeling fatigued, tired, can’t sleep at night and suffering from headaches.
This is known as jetlag and without taking the right precautions, it could really put a downer on the first few days of your trip.
Why do we get jetlag?
Our internal body clock controls when we feel sleepy and when we feel active. It’s controlled by daylight so we get used to a regular rhythm of daylight and darkness. But when you’re travelling the world, and through different time zones, your body clock will be out of sync with local time when you reach your destination.
The bad news is there’s no cure for jetlag. Within two to six days, usually, you’ll start to feel better. But if you’ve travelled a long distance to your next destination, it can take up to 14. But the good news is there are ways to cope with jetlag that lowers the impact.
Adjust your body clock
Before you leave for your next travel destination, try shifting your internal clock. It may be hard when there are a million things to do in such little time, but try getting up and going to bed slightly earlier if you’re flying east, for example, to Australia or getting up and going to bed later if you’re flying west, for example, to America.
If you’re flying in the evening, don’t sleep too much, so you’ll be naturally tired when you arrive. But if your flight arrives in the morning, sleep as much as possible during the flight so you can stay awake through the day. The minute you touch down on the next leg of your travels, get into the local routine immediately. Try to fight through and spend the day outdoors. Natural light can also help your body clock adjust.
While there are no medicines available for jetlag, medical research suggests that the hormone melatonin can be useful to people who are travelling across time zones. Speak to your NBA for more information.
Five tips for coping with jetlag
  • Walk around during your flight to exercise 
  • Eat in-flight meals to mirror the time at your destination 
  • Drink plenty of water – at least one glass every hour will keep you regularly hydrated
  • Eat carbohydrates and greens before your flight to help build up your body’s defences 
  • Don’t drink alcohol and coffee before or during your flight – this causes dehydration which contributes to jetlag

Affordable Guilt Free East African Getaways

Affordable Guilt Free East African Getaways
Samburu2BGame2BViewing Affordable Guilt Free East African Getaways
 
Nature Bound Africa blasts the myth that an East Africa vacation is only for the rich with our Guilt-Free Getaways, a collection of short getaways to East Africa that start as low as $2,500 per person.
 
“We focus on making safaris affordable,” “By putting our buying power to work, we’re able to design safaris that don’t skimp on amenities but are extremely affordable. The collection features something for everyone. Honeymooners can venture to the idyllic Indian Ocean island of Mombasa and history buffs will enjoy our Glimpses of Tanzania journey which includes a 6-night Game drive.
 
One of the most popular tours is our 9-Day Highlights of Kenya which features Mt. Kenya, Lake Nakuru and the Masai Mara — starting at $2,595 per person. There are currently six Guilt-Free Getaways all starting at less than $3,000 per person.
 
Nature Bound Africa experienced Tour Consultants work with travelers from start to finish, creating a personalized vacation within their budget. NBA’s flexibility not only gives travelers the option to mix and match different hotels to splurge in some places and “conserve” in others, but in most cases, tours can be designed to depart on almost any day of the week. And because Nature Bound Africa arranges tours throughout East Africa, travelers can arrange a full East African experience with just one phone call.
 
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Malindi Kenya’s ‘Little Italy’

Malindi, Kenya’s ‘Little Italy’

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Malindi Kenya’s ‘Little Italy’ is a small town located in coastal Kenya. It acquired the name ‘Little Italy’ because of the growing Italian population in the area, which is more than 3,000 at present. It is also estimated that Italians own more than 2,500 properties there. 
 
Three decades ago, the scene was not the same. The first batch of Italian tourists flew into the scenic coastal town in 1978 to enjoy the beautiful white sand beaches. The number of flights has been increasing ever since. 
 
Smooth cultural integration between the locals and tourists has been a major factor facilitating the transaction. Locals in Malindi have grown fond of the Italians to an extent that their relationship crosses commercial boundaries.
 
You’ll definitely be forgiven for mistaking that you’re in Rome when in Malindi. The billboards are filled with Italian advertisements. Interestingly, locals from all walks of life in the quiet town are eloquent in the language as well.
 
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