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Incredible Archaeological Sites in Africa

Incredible Archaeological Sites in Africa

Africa’s archaeological sites helped explain some of the greatest mysteries in history of mankind but there are also many that baffle modern scientists. This is because these early societies weren’t supposed to be as advanced. Here is a list of 10 incredible archaeological sites in Africa.

Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania

Olduvai Gorge is one of the most important archaeological sites on earth, let alone Africa. This is owing to the fact that it showcases the progress of human evolution. The fossils found here date back to more than 1.9 million years ago and include evidence of man as a scavenger, hunter and social being. Various types of tools have been discovered as well.

Valley of the Kings, Egypt

From the mid to the late 2nd millennium BC, Egyptian pharaohs and some members of nobility were buried in tombs constructed in the Valley of the Kings. The area has been receiving visitors since antiquity which is evident from Greek and Latin inscriptions on the walls. Unfortunately, not all visitors were tourists and over the centuries most of the 63 tombs in the area have been robbed.

Gedi Ruins, Kenya

Gedi was a city along the Kenyan coast that flourished from the 13th to the beginning of the 17th century. In the 1940s, the archaeologists excavating on the site uncovered some very interesting artifacts. These include items originating from far overseas including Spain, Venice, India and China. The city had an impressive palace, a large mosque and exquisite stone houses.

Laetoli, Tanzania

In 1976, the renowned British paleo-anthropologist Mary Leakey discovered footprints of a hominid in Laetoli. Footprints in volcanic ash revealed that this early man walked in an upright manner. Other footprints were found as well, including from hyenas, rhinos, birds, baboons and even gazelles. The scientific community was astounded since the Laetoli discovery proved that early man was walking upright approximately 3.6 million years ago.

Sterkfontein Caves, South Africa

The Sterkfontein Caves are often referred to as the Cradle of Humankind as there is no other place on earth with a larger number of hominid fossils. To date (paleo-anthropologists have been excavating on the site since the mid-1930s), remains of about 500 hominids have been found with ‘Mrs. Ples’ and ‘Little Foot’ being the most prominent. While ‘Mrs. Ples’ is the most complete skull of Australopithecus ever found, ‘Little Foot’ is one of the most complete early hominid skeletons in the world.

Blombos Cave, South Africa

The Blombos Cave has helped answer many questions about Homo sapiens that occupied the area some 100,000 years ago. The mystery of cultural origin and behavioral patterns of early man is slowly being uncovered here. According to many paleo-anthropologists, modern human behavior can be traced back to this group of Homo sapiens that was shown to be very innovative, well organized and creative. The site was discovered in 1991.

Meroe, Sudan

Meroe was one of the wealthiest cities of the ancient Kingdom of Kush. Established in 800 BC, the city was influenced greatly by the neighboring Egyptian civilization. But in the 3rd century BC, the Egyptian art, language and writing began to disappear. In the 3rd and 4th century AD, Meroe started to decline, mainly due to the collapse of external trade. Nevertheless, the remains of this ancient city which include over 200 pyramids still stand as evidence of its former splendor.

Nok, Nigeria

Nok is a village and an archaeological site in Nigeria which is famous worldwide for its terracotta figurines. The site has been dated to the mid-4 millennium BC (disputed by some) and gave name to the so-called Nok culture. This ancient civilization emerged in Nigeria in the 11th century BC and collapsed around 300 AD for unknown reasons. Archaeological finds reveal that the Nok culture was highly advanced even though West African societies supposed to be primitive at that time.

Koobi Fora, Kenya

The area around Koobi Fora is renowned for sandstones and siltstones containing well preserved remains of hominins and terrestrial mammals dating back as far as 4.2 million years ago. Hominin fossils that have been discovered in Koobi Fora include: Australopithecus anamensis, Australopithecus boisei, Homo habilis, Homo rudolfensis and Homo ergaster. Also found were many stone tools most of which, however, aren’t associated with hominins.

Laas Gaal, Somalia

Laas Gaal is a complex of rockhouses and caves containing rock art dating back to 9,000 BC. The rock paintings shows people worshiping cows with large horns and ceremonial robes. Locals knew about the rockhouses and caves for hundreds of years before a team of French researches discovered the site in 2002. Like many other archaeological sites in Somalia, Laas Gaal hasn’t been fully explored yet.

 

Pack for a Purpose Small Space Little Effort

Pack for a Purpose Small Space Little Effort Big Impact

pfap logo suitcase 600x315 Pack for a Purpose Small Space Little Effort

Pack for a Purpose Small Space Little Effort Big Impact

Nature Bound Africa is delighted to support The Plaster House is a very special home in Arusha that enables children, from all over Tanzania, to recover after they have had corrective surgery, orthopaedic surgery, plastic surgery or neurosurgery for a disability.
The Plaster House
The home currently serves more than 160 children. The children are housed here until they are ready to return home. Schooling is provided while they are recovering here, in addition to all the other services that ensure a positive outcome for their recovery. You can make a Big Impact in the lives of over 150 children when you bring the requested and needed supplies for The Plaster House on your holiday there .
 
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Uganda the pearl of Africa

Uganda the pearl of Africa

Rwanda Uganda Gorilla Tracking Tours Gorilla Watching Congo Uganda the pearl of Africa

 
Its reputation of being Africa’s friendliest country originates from the fact that traditionally hospitality is a key element to its diverse population. Uganda is well  known for its low level of crimes and hassles towards tourists. As one of the mysteries of the Victorian age you can go back in time as you view the source of the Nile that starts here and flow all the way to Egypt. Be part of history that was once here.
 
Uganda is Africa’s most complete bird-watching destination
Within an area comparable to that of Great Britain, Uganda is Africa’s most complete bird-watching destination with more than a thousand species recorded here. Spread across both sides of the equator one can have the opportunity to experience the biodiversity of the various national parks and protected areas across the country. Uganda’s star attraction lies divided between Bwindi National Park and the Virunga Mountains here lays the endangered mountain gorilla the bulkiest of all living primates.
 
Lakes and Rivers
This country is endowed with mesmerizing tracts of thorn-bush savannah teaming with various rainforests. Lakes and rivers heavy with aquatic life and the glacial peaks of Africa’s tallest mountain range. Uganda chose to embrace eco-tourism based on the fact that it promotes low-impact tourism avoids the adverse environmental effects of traditional tourism and from the sale of natural resources. Adding to this choice of tourism is the fact that it also appeals to different groups of people such as tourists, environmentalists, businesses as well as governments.
 
Given the ever rising concerns and threats that global warming poses, Uganda has continued to practice eco-tourism to minimize the negative effects that global warming would not only cause to her environment but also her tourism industry.
 
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Safari Adventure Travel Tips 

Safari Adventure Travel Tips 

Mount Kenya 1024x698 Safari Adventure Travel Tips 

8 Tried and Tested Safari Tips
[1] Go on as many game drives as you can

If you want to see a lot of wildlife, your chances increase in numbers. You can’t expect to see all of the ‘Big Five’ on one game drive; that’s like winning the safari lottery. Be patient, take in the amazing scenery, keep an eye out, and eventually you will see a lot of amazing wildlife.

[2] Don’t miss out on a night drive

Most of the major national parks and game reserves give visitors the option to go on a guided night drive. Make sure to do at least one! It’s a unique chance to see nocturnal animals (e.g. lions, leopards and hyenas) being active.

[3] Bring a good camera

You’re definitely going to want to document the amazing scenery and wildlife you see. To get the best quality photos possible, a DSLR is ideal. However, if you don’t have one already and don’t want to dish out the big bucks before going on a pricey safari, it is possible to get some great photos using a good point-and-shoot with a decent zoom.

[4] Get binoculars or a fancy zoom lens

Most of the animals you’ll see won’t be right next to the safari truck. So if you’ll want to get a good close-up look, you’ll need a pair of binoculars (if you only have a point-and-shoot camera), or a DSLR with a big zoom lens. Of course the latter would be better because then you’ll also get amazing close-up photos, like this one:

[5] Wear earth colours

Bright colours and patterns can scare away some animals, so it’s a good idea to wear clothing in neutral earth colours, which will help you blend into the natural environment.

[6] Resist the urge to yell “Pumbaa!” when you see a warthog

Not only would this make you look slightly immature (and obnoxious), but it would probably also scare away the warthog and any other animals that happened to be nearby. Try to generally be as quiet as possible during a game drive.

[7] Don’t flash an angry elephant

Elephants are a lot scarier than they might seem. These massive animals often hang out on safari routes, get very close to trucks and sometimes get pretty peeved off at tourist paparazzi (especially when there are calves about). You can tell an elephant is angry when it’s fanning out and shaking its ears. Elephants are one of the few animals that can take down a safari truck, so if you want to avoid being charged and trampled, it’s a good idea to stop taking pictures when an angry elephant is close by–this is particularly important on night drives when you’re taking pictures with flash.

[8] Bring a head torch

When you’re camping in national parks and reserves while on safari–or really anytime you’re camping or backpacking anywhere–a head torch (otherwise known as a headlamp) is a very handy thing to have on hand. Not only will it light the way to anywhere you need to go after dark, but it’ll also leave your hands free to shuffle through your things to find whatever you’re looking for in your pack or tent, and even allow you to easily read a book in the dark. I never go on a backpacking trip without one!

Have you been on safari and have some tips of your own? Please share them by leaving a comment below.

African Safari Travel Tips

African Safari Travel Tips

African Safari Travel Tips that you’ll definitely want to take into account before heading out on your next big African safari adventure.

1. Go on as many game drives as you can 
If you want to see a lot of wildlife, your chances increase in numbers. You can’t expect to see all of the ‘Big Five’ on one game drive; that’s like winning the safari lottery. Be patient, take in the amazing scenery, keep an eye out, and eventually you will see a lot of amazing wildlife.
2. Don’t miss out on a night drive

3466399665 2ac8532e87 o African Safari Travel Tips

Most of the major national parks and game reserves give visitors the option to go on a guided night drive. Make sure to do at least one! It’s a unique chance to see nocturnal animals (e.g. lions, leopards and hyenas) being active. 

3. Bring a good camera
2404544591 ebb0f0aa2b b African Safari Travel Tips
 
You’re definitely going to want to document the amazing scenery and wildlife you see. To get the best quality photos possible, a DSLR is ideal. However, if you don’t have one already and don’t want to dish out the big bucks before going on a pricey safari, it is possible to get some great photos using a good point-and-shoot with a decent zoom.
4. Get binoculars or a fancy zoom lens
4263483849 845267dd29 b African Safari Travel Tips
Most of the animals you’ll see won’t be right next to the safari truck. So if you’ll want to get a good close-up look, you’ll need a pair of binoculars (if you only have a point-and-shoot camera), or a DSLR with a big zoom lens. Of course the latter would be better because then you’ll also get amazing close-up photos, like this one:
5. Wear Earth colors

201103 a stylish traveler safari African Safari Travel Tips

Bright colors and patterns can scare away some animals, so it’s a good idea to wear clothing in neutral earth colours, which will help you blend into the natural environment.
6. Resist the urge to yell “Pumbaa!” when you see a warthog
11330921116 cf2e4b2749 b African Safari Travel Tips
Not only would this make you look slightly silly, but it would probably also scare away the warthog and any other animals that happened to be nearby. Try to generally be as quiet as possible during a game drive.
7. Don’t flash an angry elephant
5637277565 3186565d27 b African Safari Travel Tips
Elephants are a lot scarier than they might seem. These massive animals often hang out on safari routes, get very close to trucks and sometimes get pretty peeved off at tourist paparazzi (especially when there are calves about). You can tell an elephant is angry when it’s fanning out and shaking its ears. Elephants are one of the only animals that can take down a safari truck, so if you want to avoid being charged and trampled, it’s a good idea to stop taking pictures when an angry elephant is close by–this is particularly important on night drives when you’re taking pictures with flash.
8. Bring a head lamp.

12 led head lamp 1024x748 African Safari Travel Tips

When you’re camping in national parks and reserves while on safari–or really anytime you’re camping or backpacking anywhere–a head torch (otherwise known as a headlamp) is a very handy thing to have on hand. Not only will it light the way to anywhere you need to go after dark, but it’ll also leave your hands free to shuffle through your things to find whatever you’re looking for in your pack or tent, and even allow you to easily read a book in the dark. I never go on a backpacking trip without one! 

Have you been on safari and have some tips of your own? Please share them by leaving a comment below.
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