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Places You Must Visit in Tanzania

Places You Must Visit in Tanzania

Places You Must Visit in Tanzania Travel Planning & Tips, Tanzania, Ngorongoro Crater, Mount Kilimanjaro, Great Migration, Serengeti

morkel wb1 Places You Must Visit in Tanzania

Places You Must Visit in Tanzania a country with the most polite and hospitable people in Africa, where the locals will not shy away from apologizing or making all their requests in the most courteous of manner.
Being the largest of the East African countries, Tanzania has a large share of attractions ranging from lakes, mountains, islands and numerous game parks and reserves. For this reason, we have narrowed the attractions to those five that you cannot afford to miss on your Tanzanian visit. These are the five places that will make your travel worthwhile.
5. Mafia Island

When you are looking to get away from the hustle and stress of this hectic lifestyle, then Mafia Island is just what the doctor ordered. As if stuck in a time warp, this unexplored gem takes you back into time with the lack of tarmac roads, few hotels and lack of ATM machines. But despite that, the island will blow you away with the white sandy beaches that go on for miles and miles, the clear shimmering aquamarine waters and the peace and quiet.

Boasting an incredible barrier reef teeming with marine life, you have a chance to scuba dive and snorkel in what is probably one of the best scuba diving spots in the world. You could even catch a glimpse of a whale shark or a humpback whale which are found around the island waters.

The island is also rich in history with 15th Century ruins at Ras Kisimani. You would not want to miss the spectacular and romantic sunrise and sunset over the island. This island offers the perfect ‘Cast-away’ experience.

4. Ngorongoro Crater

A candidate for the new seven wonders of the world, this massive crater holds it own in that category. Being the world’s largest unbroken caldera, Ngorongoro is home to over 25,000 animals. It is considered one of the best game viewing spots in the world with a chance to see the big five, zebras and wildebeests. The crater holds almost every individual species of wildlife in East Africa including the extremely rare and critically endangered Black Rhino.

3. Mount Kilimanjaro

This magnificent wonder of creation which has been nicknamed ‘The Roof of Africa’, really is a sight to behold. Standing at 5,895 metres above sea level, Mt. Kilimanjaro is not only the tallest mountain in Africa, it is also the tallest free standing mountain in the world. Rising from the cultivated lands at the bottom through forests and alpine vegetation to a snow capped tip, this mountain is alluring to the adventure seeking ones.

While on the trek or the descent, you get a chance to enjoy the varied and unique vegetation and wildlife including the elephants and buffaloes. So whether its a spiritual journey or an adventure, this hulk of a mountain is exactly what you are looking for. The ultimate climbing experience.

2. Zanzibar Island

Commonly known as the ‘Spice Island’, Zanzibar is an island associated with mystery and romance.The fragrant scents of cloves, cardamom, nutmeg and vanilla hung in the warm tropical air.

A walk through ‘Stone Town’ is similar to going back in time with narrow winding streets, bazaars, mosques, fortresses and a Persian style public bathhouse. The ruins of palaces and ancient mosques attest to the rich history of the Island.

Those looking for romance are in for a treat with the presence of long, white, unspoilt sandy beaches flanked by lush coastal vegetation. There are numerous honeymoon and romantic packages in the many hotels and resorts that ensure that each day is happier than the last. Scuba diving spots abound and the Pemba Channel is reputed to have some of the best game fishing anywhere in the world.

From getting views of spectacular views of the sunrise and sunset, to dipping your feet into the warm ocean waters wrapped in the arms of the one you love, Zanzibar Island really feels like it is cupid’s playground.

1. The Serengeti National Park

This park is the ultimate safari experience and is celebrated the world over. Not only is it one of the largest parks in the world, it also hosts the greatest animal migratory spectacle in the planet!

This is where over 90,000 visitors flock to catch a glimpse of the millions of ungulates as they make their way through plains, dry land and even crocodile infested rivers. Covering 1.5 million hectares, the park is teeming with all kinds of wildlife, from the big five to cheetahs, giraffes, hyenas, wild dogs…. the list is inexhaustible.

Not to be left behind are the over 500 species of bird life, very much a birdwatcher’s paradise. Enjoy panoramic views of the vast Serengeti by taking a ride in the hot air balloons. Indulge yourself in the 5 star amenities and services in the lodges and resorts that have been set up in the park. Do not miss a chance to visit this mother of all national parks.

Kasubi Tombs of Buganda Kings

Kasubi Tombs of Buganda Kings

Kasubi Tombs of Buganda Kings at Kasubi tombs constitute a site embracing almost 30 ha of hillside within Kampala district. It is a major example of an architectural achievement in organic materials. The site’s main significance lies, however, in its intangible values of belief, spirituality, continuity and identity.

Buganda Kasubi Tombs of Buganda Kings

Photo: Flickr/Rajarajaraja

 Made with reed and bark cloth with a thatched roof, the Kasubi Tombs are a cultural site of Buganda Kingdom as it is where the four Buganda Kings are buried. They were a popular tourist destination in Uganda and a classified UNESCO heritage site.
site 1021 Kasubi Tombs of Buganda Kings

Photo: UNESCO

site 1020 Kasubi Tombs of Buganda Kings

 

site 1023 Kasubi Tombs of Buganda Kings

Photo: CRAterre

 

site 1019 Kasubi Tombs of Buganda Kings

Photo: UNESCO

 

Kampalas Kasubi Tombs Kasubi Tombs of Buganda Kings

The interior of the MuzibuAzaalaMpanga

On 16 March 2010, some of the major buildings there were almost completely destroyed by a fire, the cause of which is under investigation. The Buganda Kingdom has vowed to rebuild the tombs of their kings and President Museveni said the national government of Uganda would assist in the restoration of the site.

The world famous Maasai Mara

The world famous Maasai Mara

wildebeest migrations The world famous Maasai Mara

Maasai Mara

The world famous Maasai Mara is home to the Great Migration, July through October each year. It also boasts astonishing amount of resident wildlife. The rolling grasslands, the Mara River and the Rift Valley all make for great game viewing and wildlife photography.

Amboseli

To capture the definitive Kenyan wildlife shot, visit Amboseli and photograph herds of elephant wandering past the foot of Mount Kilimanjaro. Amboseli’s big skies and far horizons, combined with swampy springs and dry and dusty earth trampled by hundreds of animals, is a safari paradise – and the views of Mount Kilimanjaro are incomparable.

Tsavo

The twin National Parks of Tsavo East and West form one of Africa’s largest wilderness reserves, incorporating savannah, ranges and hills, acacia and montane forest, and an extensive river system. Tsavo is a bird watcher’s paradise, and viewing hippo and crocodile in the crystal clear waters of the volcanic Mzima springs is unique in all of East Africa.

Mount Kenya

Africa’s second highest mountain, Mount Kenya, is both a Unesco World Heritage site and a Unesco Biosphere Reserve. The mountain is best seen at dawn, when the day’s early light silhouettes its impressive summit high over the surrounding mountains. Trekking on Mount Kenya, for all levels of walkers, is a true African wilderness adventure. Meru Made famous by conservationists George and Joy Adamson, Meru is where Elsa the lioness was raised. With impressive views of Mount Kenya, visitors to this lovely wilderness may see eland, Bohor reedbuck, black rhino and some of the more than 427-recorded bird species in the park’s diverse habitats.

Samburu

Samburu is the best place to find several endemic Northern species, including gerenuk, the reticulated giraffe and Grevy’s zebra. Lions are frequently seen on the riverbanks, and cheetah can be found on the open plains together with huge herds of elephant. Travellers will also delight in meeting the Samburu people, who call this wild part of Kenya home.

Laikipia

This spectacular region is the gateway to Kenya’s northern frontier country. Wild and sparsely populated, much of Laikipia is covered by privately owned ranches where cattle share the land with free-ranging wildlife. Horseback riding through Laikipia’s wilderness is a true African adventure.

Lake Naivasha

This fresh water lake, fringed by thick papyrus, is home to an incredible variety of birds, including the pink-backed pelican, goliath heron and giant kingfisher. The waters of the lake draw a great range of game: giraffe feed on the acacia, buffalo wallow in the shallow waters and colobus monkeys call from the treetops.

Lamu

End your Kenyan safari by spending a few days in the ancient town of Lamu on the Indian Ocean coast. The winding streets, traditional houses and carved woods hark back to the Swahili culture of old.

How to cope with jetlag

How to cope with jetlag

jet lag How to cope with jetlag

Jetlag can ruin the start of your adventure in a new country. There’s no cure for it but there are ways of dealing with it.

You touch down on the next leg of your Holiday Safari Adventure Experience in Africa, but the quick change of time zones means you’re feeling fatigued, tired, can’t sleep at night and suffering from headaches.
This is known as jetlag and without taking the right precautions, it could really put a downer on the first few days of your trip.
Why do we get jetlag?
Our internal body clock controls when we feel sleepy and when we feel active. It’s controlled by daylight so we get used to a regular rhythm of daylight and darkness. But when you’re travelling the world, and through different time zones, your body clock will be out of sync with local time when you reach your destination.
The bad news is there’s no cure for jetlag. Within two to six days, usually, you’ll start to feel better. But if you’ve travelled a long distance to your next destination, it can take up to 14. But the good news is there are ways to cope with jetlag that lowers the impact.
Adjust your body clock
Before you leave for your next travel destination, try shifting your internal clock. It may be hard when there are a million things to do in such little time, but try getting up and going to bed slightly earlier if you’re flying east, for example, to Australia or getting up and going to bed later if you’re flying west, for example, to America.
If you’re flying in the evening, don’t sleep too much, so you’ll be naturally tired when you arrive. But if your flight arrives in the morning, sleep as much as possible during the flight so you can stay awake through the day. The minute you touch down on the next leg of your travels, get into the local routine immediately. Try to fight through and spend the day outdoors. Natural light can also help your body clock adjust.
While there are no medicines available for jetlag, medical research suggests that the hormone melatonin can be useful to people who are travelling across time zones. Speak to your NBA for more information.
Five tips for coping with jetlag
  • Walk around during your flight to exercise 
  • Eat in-flight meals to mirror the time at your destination 
  • Drink plenty of water – at least one glass every hour will keep you regularly hydrated
  • Eat carbohydrates and greens before your flight to help build up your body’s defences 
  • Don’t drink alcohol and coffee before or during your flight – this causes dehydration which contributes to jetlag

Incredible Archaeological Sites in Africa

Incredible Archaeological Sites in Africa

Africa’s archaeological sites helped explain some of the greatest mysteries in history of mankind but there are also many that baffle modern scientists. This is because these early societies weren’t supposed to be as advanced. Here is a list of 10 incredible archaeological sites in Africa.

Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania

Olduvai Gorge is one of the most important archaeological sites on earth, let alone Africa. This is owing to the fact that it showcases the progress of human evolution. The fossils found here date back to more than 1.9 million years ago and include evidence of man as a scavenger, hunter and social being. Various types of tools have been discovered as well.

Valley of the Kings, Egypt

From the mid to the late 2nd millennium BC, Egyptian pharaohs and some members of nobility were buried in tombs constructed in the Valley of the Kings. The area has been receiving visitors since antiquity which is evident from Greek and Latin inscriptions on the walls. Unfortunately, not all visitors were tourists and over the centuries most of the 63 tombs in the area have been robbed.

Gedi Ruins, Kenya

Gedi was a city along the Kenyan coast that flourished from the 13th to the beginning of the 17th century. In the 1940s, the archaeologists excavating on the site uncovered some very interesting artifacts. These include items originating from far overseas including Spain, Venice, India and China. The city had an impressive palace, a large mosque and exquisite stone houses.

Laetoli, Tanzania

In 1976, the renowned British paleo-anthropologist Mary Leakey discovered footprints of a hominid in Laetoli. Footprints in volcanic ash revealed that this early man walked in an upright manner. Other footprints were found as well, including from hyenas, rhinos, birds, baboons and even gazelles. The scientific community was astounded since the Laetoli discovery proved that early man was walking upright approximately 3.6 million years ago.

Sterkfontein Caves, South Africa

The Sterkfontein Caves are often referred to as the Cradle of Humankind as there is no other place on earth with a larger number of hominid fossils. To date (paleo-anthropologists have been excavating on the site since the mid-1930s), remains of about 500 hominids have been found with ‘Mrs. Ples’ and ‘Little Foot’ being the most prominent. While ‘Mrs. Ples’ is the most complete skull of Australopithecus ever found, ‘Little Foot’ is one of the most complete early hominid skeletons in the world.

Blombos Cave, South Africa

The Blombos Cave has helped answer many questions about Homo sapiens that occupied the area some 100,000 years ago. The mystery of cultural origin and behavioral patterns of early man is slowly being uncovered here. According to many paleo-anthropologists, modern human behavior can be traced back to this group of Homo sapiens that was shown to be very innovative, well organized and creative. The site was discovered in 1991.

Meroe, Sudan

Meroe was one of the wealthiest cities of the ancient Kingdom of Kush. Established in 800 BC, the city was influenced greatly by the neighboring Egyptian civilization. But in the 3rd century BC, the Egyptian art, language and writing began to disappear. In the 3rd and 4th century AD, Meroe started to decline, mainly due to the collapse of external trade. Nevertheless, the remains of this ancient city which include over 200 pyramids still stand as evidence of its former splendor.

Nok, Nigeria

Nok is a village and an archaeological site in Nigeria which is famous worldwide for its terracotta figurines. The site has been dated to the mid-4 millennium BC (disputed by some) and gave name to the so-called Nok culture. This ancient civilization emerged in Nigeria in the 11th century BC and collapsed around 300 AD for unknown reasons. Archaeological finds reveal that the Nok culture was highly advanced even though West African societies supposed to be primitive at that time.

Koobi Fora, Kenya

The area around Koobi Fora is renowned for sandstones and siltstones containing well preserved remains of hominins and terrestrial mammals dating back as far as 4.2 million years ago. Hominin fossils that have been discovered in Koobi Fora include: Australopithecus anamensis, Australopithecus boisei, Homo habilis, Homo rudolfensis and Homo ergaster. Also found were many stone tools most of which, however, aren’t associated with hominins.

Laas Gaal, Somalia

Laas Gaal is a complex of rockhouses and caves containing rock art dating back to 9,000 BC. The rock paintings shows people worshiping cows with large horns and ceremonial robes. Locals knew about the rockhouses and caves for hundreds of years before a team of French researches discovered the site in 2002. Like many other archaeological sites in Somalia, Laas Gaal hasn’t been fully explored yet.

 
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